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U.K. insurtech jobs booming

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Jobs in insurtech are increasing 22 times faster than the rest of the U.K. market, according to a report from Accenture. And Brexit isn’t going to slow things down.

The sector saw significant investment levels, says the report, hitting US$250 million in just the first six months of 2017. This was twice the level of investment in insurtech in the rest of the European Union.

Accenture predicts this level of growth is unlikely to be stalled by Brexit. The number of insurtech jobs grew by 22 percent per month over the course of 2017. This is way above the employment growth rate of just one percent for the whole U.K. economy, as reported by the analytics company Joblift.

Most In Demand Insurtech Roles

Accenture says the most in-demand roles in insurtech in the U.K. market are:

  • web developers
  • data analysts
  • programmers

Interestingly, vacancies in traditional insurance have seen a decline, despite that seven out of every 10 insurance jobs is within the ‘traditional’ sector. Frankfurt, Europe’s other main insurance (and insurtech) hub, has seen similar patterns, according to Insurance Business magazine.

These patterns are a clear sign of how the insurance sector is changing as a result of insurtech startup disruption.

Nshish Nangla, senior director of insurtech and digital transformation at Synechron, says: “The latest technology trends will definitely change how the market works and how people interact with each other, as well as how things are presented in the market. There’s going to be a lot of change around customer engagement and how insurers communicate with their customers, and that might lead to disintermediation.”

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Five insurtech startups to watch out for in 2019

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The insurtech sector has grown rapidly in recent years, with a number of startups launching new products and making it easier for consumers to buy insurance. Many of these are products of startup accelerators. The most successful insurtech players, according to TechWorld, appear to be those who focus on building new products to address the changing needs of the customer.

Insurance-as-a-service

The traditional model of an insurance company offering a standardized product to the customer is on its way out. Many customers, especially millennials, want more choice and a flexible approach to insurance products.

This flexibility to decide what to insure (“insurance as a service”) is being met by several insurtechs, who are offering insurance products tailored to the customer. An example is the company Valoo, which offers a straightforward way for customers to make an inventory of possessions. This can be via video or photographs. These items can then be valued by artificial intelligence scanning the items, and then short-term insurance being offered.

Blockchain

InsurTech startups are deploying blockchain technology to disrupt the insurance industry. One important application is using the technology to allow insurers and customers to verify the location of goods around the world in real-terms. This has helped to facilitate peer-to-peer operations in financial services.

An example of this service comes from Dynamis, which uses Ethereum, to offer peer-to-peer unemployment insurance, in the form of supplemental unemployment insurance.

According to Foresight Factory, Dynamis pays premiums into a de-centralised contract, setting up individual accounts for all its employees. If there are no claims, the premiums gradually go down. For employees, the account allows them to use the money while seeking employment and to transfer the details to their new workplace.

Big data analytics

Big data encompasses the massive amount of stored information on anybody who has ever had a digital connection and this data is of value to insurance companies. The startup Cystellar operates a cloud-based big data analytics platform. The aim is to offer insurance firms data-driven decision making.

Cystellar’s platform uses predictive analytics for insurtech firms. The main focus of the platform is on trying to predict and thereby avoid damaging events, such as natural disasters that might affect agtech and foodtech companies.

Claims reduction

With traditional insurance, people pay in the same money (which often goes up) whether a claim is made or not. This model is challenged by the startup Laka. The company operates a community-based model for bicycle insurance. The monthly maximum is fixed at around £18. However, this amount can be reduced, depending on how many claims are filed by the wider community.

Security-as-a-service

Cyberattacks are a feature of modern life. To help drive down insurance costs, many companies are keen to know how they can improve their systems and services.

An example of a startup in this space is ThreatInformer. The company provides cyber risk intelligence to the insurance industry. The firm creates tools for users to transform the way risks are written, using a security-as-a-service platform. The aim is to use analysis of security assessments and environmental factors to enable business users see the full risk picture.

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Five emerging Insurtechs to take notice of

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Insurance companies have been slow to embrace digital technology; however, signs are emerging that the industry is gradually opening up to the idea of alternative ways of providing insurance services.

The conservative nature of the insurance sector was summed up last year by Andrew Brem, chief digital officer at insurance group Aviva, who said, as quoted by TechWorld, that the sector is “not known for its incredible radicalism”.

Whether it is due to threats from startups or realization that startups can provide competitive advantages for big insurance companies, the major players are starting to engage with startups. The types of new technologies disrupting the insurance sector include mobile apps, investment in digital channels, process to hire technology talent and platforms for analyzing customer data.

Moreover, research from London accelerator Startupbootcamp and PwC indicates that 75 percent of incumbent insurers “believe the biggest impact to the industry will come from building new products in order to address the changing needs of the customer”.

Five Insurtech startups of interest

A number of Insurtech startups are causing interest in the industry, and helping to introduce innovative new technology into the business of insurance:

  • The startup Cytora has produced technology termed Risk Engine. This software can be used by commercial insurers to target and price risk using artificial intelligence algorithms. The star-up was supported by the University of Cambridge’s Judge Business School Accelerate Programme.
  • The company InMyBag came about as an answer to the gap in the insurance market for mobile workers who are reliant on portable technology. InMyBag insures mobile devices such as laptops, phones and cameras. InMyBag works with Amazon Prime and Apple to guarantee same day replacement of the devices.
  • Brolly is a London-based startup that is deploys artificial intelligence to provide customers with a mobile insurance locker. The locker stores existing and expired policy documents. Also offered is an advisor, to suggest insurance coverage and an online shop.
  • Digital Fineprint uses machine learning technology to provide smart insurance policy recommendations. This is based on the social media profile of the user data. As an example, LinkedIn data might be used to assess a person’s income and Facebook data provides an assessment of an individual’s appetite for risk.
  • Digital Risks targets technology companies and provides a flexible, pay monthly Insurance-as-a-Service model. The scheme enables companies using the services to start off with insuring small items, like a laptop, and then gravitating to something like employer liability insurance or insurance against data breaches.

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Innovation and the customer go hand-in-hand says League’s Michael Serbinis

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Michael Serbinis
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According to Michael Serbinis, CEO and founder of digital health benefits company League, the insurance world is lagging behind the times. It’s slow, relies too much on paper, and is not customer-centric. And League aims to change that.

“The existing guys are still growing and still doing well from a profitability standpoint,” Serbinis said in an interview with DX Journal. “They see any kind of new tech as cute or novel, but not something you talk about at a board meeting, or something that’s going change the effect of the quarter or year.

The lack of major innovation in both process and technology is something legacy insurance providers are no doubt keenly aware of and focused on.

A report from McKinsey details that younger, digitally-native consumers are turning to insurtech companies out of a desire for convenience and a love of mobile technology. Insurtech’s early adoption of technology such as IoT and blockchain puts them ahead of their entrenched insurance rivals, states the McKinsey report — and not just when it comes to a customer interface, but when it comes to “venturing into untapped markets and addressing unmet needs.”

It’s not just customers that have been responsive to the insurtech approach to insurance services. By some estimates, nearly half (48%) of all SMEs will look to digital insurance options over conventional providers within the next four years. Furthermore, a report from PwC, has recommended that every major insurance provider prepare for the future of healthcare where customer-centric tools that are personalized and easy-to-use are tablestakes.

“When insurance companies start to pay attention, usually what they do is very surface,” said Serbinis. “In the world of health insurance, that tends to mean better websites and a new app, to use your existing structure of a health insurance plan.”

Enter League

Serbinis, a self-described rocket scientist turned entrepreneur, founded League in 2014 after watching how much trouble people had trying to access benefits. Generally speaking, things keep getting more expensive with no additional value offered, and often a cumbersome or antiquated user experience.

A serial entrepreneur, Serbinis holds a steady series of startup success stories under his belt; from his early work with the Musk brothers in California, to his building up of web-based file storage company DocSpace, to co-founding the massive e-reader company Kobo.

While League started out as a portal for benefits users and health vendors, League now offers businesses a versatile selection of insurance options.

The company strives to offer layers of flexibility; employers can choose from traditional group plans and health spending accounts, or lifestyle spending accounts that include a variety of therapy choices not usually found in conventional plans. On top of the offering, the company gives employers a suite of administrative tools to makes the process paperless, automated and easy to navigate.

“This is an industry that’s filled with paper-based processes. And processes that involve a lot of humans,” said Serbinis. “By our very nature, we’re an end-to-end digital benefits platform that connects not only all the financial services providers – the insurance companies, the retirement companies, the enterprise and their HR system, their payroll system — but most importantly, the end consumer, the end employee, that’s got the League app on their phone and can avoid having to deal with the same paper and frustration and delay.”

League’s insurance offering is delivered via a digital wallet where employees can coordinate health appointments and services from more than 1,000 health vendors within the app itself. Digital records and claims are managed by League so employees can skip the paperwork.

“We have become the end-to-end digital platform for offering all benefits and health insurance to employees,” said Serbinis. “We replace the plastic cards, paper and booklets (given out to employees) with a unified wallet that has all your coverage and benefits in one place. And then a bunch of services around it to help you get the most out of your benefits — to get the services you need better, faster, cheaper.”

The newest addition to League’s set of tools is something the company calls Health Concierge — a chatbot interface that lets employees contact a registered nurse through the app.

A personalized evolution

The biggest evolution at League came when the company shifted away from simply coordinating consumer health vendors with insurance groups, to then taking on the full responsibilities of an insurance provider. It was a pivotal and long-lasting decision, says Serbinis — and it’s one that he believes puts League ahead of other Canadian benefits providers.

Transitioning from a health vendor marketplace to a provider of every level of the insurance process allows League to implement its technological innovations — like the Health Concierge — and scale them to benefit the entire insurance process, for both employers and employees.

“The customer-centric approach is largely about empowering people to live their best lives,” said Serbinis. “The way to do that is not only putting lipstick on a pig in terms of a better website, but it’s fundamentally about giving that end-user more choice and freedom and leveraging data to make great recommendations and provide a personalized experience. I think a lot of people are missing the boat on that.”

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