Connect with us

Leadership

Jodi Kovitz’s advice for how any company can move the dial on inclusiveness

Published

on

#MoveTheDial Founder & CEO, Jodi Kovitz
#MoveTheDial Founder & CEO, Jodi Kovitz
Share this:

Diversity and inclusion in the workforce won’t happen because you wish it – you must take action, says #MoveTheDial Founder & CEO, Jodi Kovitz.

“Many women talk about critical turning points where someone, in a really small moment in their career, gave them an opportunity for step changes,” Kovitz told DX Journal. “If you go to a meeting with your executive team, ask if you can bring a young woman with you so she can learn. Give her a chance to contribute or make an introduction. Then get out of the way and empower her to rise to her own potential.”

#MoveTheDial was started in January 2017 when Kovitz ran the organization off the side of her desk as CEO of AceTech (now PeerScale). In January she moved into a full-time role at #MoveTheDial and has landed corporate backing from founding partners such as CIBC, TD, Osler, TWG and WealthSimple.

The mission is clear: Increase the participation and leadership of all women in tech.

“[A commitment] cannot live in an annual report, or in a strategic plan in a drawer,” Kovitz said. “It takes an active commitment at the strategic top of the house. They have to go out of their way to make it happen.”

As part of #MoveTheDial’s mission, Kovitz has been studying relationships and patterns of companies where inclusiveness is more common and where more opportunity exists for women. One of the commonalities is women being invited to a meeting, event, presentation or coffee meeting that was outside of her normal daily routine.

“Some women talk about being given a moment they didn’t think they deserved, but it was a career opportunity for step change,” Kovitz said.

Indeed, studies have shown women are more likely than men to suffer a “confidence gap”, as The Atlantic explored, where some women underestimate their abilities and performance. Kovitz has found a practical way to address this in the workplace: leadership teams and colleagues can step up by inviting women to step forward more.

Where the dial is today

No matter whose numbers you look at, it’s clear there is a lot of work ahead.

Statista used various tech companies’ diversity reports to plot gender representation within the overall workforce, and within tech jobs:

Infographic: The Tech World Is Still a Man's World | Statista

At a board level, 70 percent of startups have no women on their boards of directors.

In Canada, recent media coverage called Canada’s lack of female CEOs among top TSX companies “embarrassing.”

#MoveTheDial shared the following snapshot:

While there still is a lot of work to do to, Kovitz does believe progress is taking shape around inclusion and awareness has improved. Some examples:

Moving the dial at startups VS large enterprise

While there are exceptions to every rule, Kovitz believes larger enterprises are further ahead when it comes to creating a culture of inclusiveness and diversity.

“When you’re scaling as fast as so many tech companies have to, it requires a high degree of intentionality,” she said. Kovitz said speed of growth, urgent need for talent and investor pressure are among some of the reasons startups and scaleups don’t take the time to pause and conduct a talent search that is inclusive.

Kovitz said she has found herself having to stop and deliberately design an inclusive search and hiring process now that she is running her own company, because speed of growth can quickly become consuming if you don’t curb it.

Many large enterprises have also moved the dial further along by setting up initiatives such as inclusion teams, throwing more funding at inclusiveness and setting out to build cultures of belonging.

“They’re using targets to drive toward meaningful change,” Kovitz said.

She notes Microsoft, Google and Cisco are pushing forward to move the dial. Microsoft, for example, is using its platform to push for tangible change in the number of women in STEM industries (here’s a March 7 blog post on the subject).

Kovitz’s hope is that one day we won’t need to talk about the gender of a leader because inclusiveness will be more commonplace.

“Hiring a diverse talent pool should be as important as revenue,” Kovitz said. “If you don’t do it from the outset, it’s very tricky to backfill it later. You can’t hire someone that looks like you just because it’s comfortable,” she said. “It takes more time to go broader.”

Chris is a partner at Digital Journal Inc. (parent company of DX Journal) who has spent the last 15 years working in publishing, digital media, broadcasting, advertising, social media & marketing, data and analytics. 

Share this:

Investment

Setting Canada up for long-term success is about talent and collaboration

Minister Navdeep Bains talks to DX Journal about Canada’s innovation economy

Published

on

Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Navdeep Bains. - Photo by DX Journal
Navdeep Bains, Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, speaking at CIX2018. Photo by DX Journal
Share this:

Canada’s $1.26-billion Strategic Innovation Fund is being used to provide investment for everything from aerial firefighting technology to satellites for the global shipping industry. The fund is just one of the ways the Trudeau government is emphasizing innovation and the new digital economy in its economic policies.

In an interview with DX Journal at CIX 2018, Canada’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Navdeep Bains, gave his perspective on the continuing efforts of the Government of Canada to support innovation across the country.


Navdeep Bains on how Canada is driving innovation

“The government really understands that we have a very special moment, that Canada is looked at as a leader when it comes to innovation,” Bains said. “Part of that success is attributed to the fact that we’re investing in people. We’re really focussed on not only developing incredible Canadian talent, but how we have access to global talent as well.”

That special moment is not only helping promote successful Canadian startups and businesses – it’s also encouraging technology companies such as Amazon and Salesforce to increase their footprint north of the U.S. border.

Canada is also getting recognition for its innovation and technology ecosystem, as evidenced by the recent announcement that Montreal will host an upcoming G7 conference on AI technology, as part of the larger Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) conference. The event is the largest congregation around AI and machine learning in the world.


Navdeep Bains on private and public sectors driving innovation

Bains said the focus for him and the federal government is placing a priority on people, with specific attention to diversity.

“We’re making investments in education – in lifelong learning through coding, and really leveraging immigration,” Bains said. “It’s about tech adoption. It’s about commercialization. As we invest in talent, we’re also very focused on making sure that companies have the ability to scale up.”

In order to support scaleups, Bains said the government is focused on providing access to the best technology and enabling commercialization and speed-to-market.

“That’s really the focal point,” said Bains. “How can we help companies deal with talent and people? How can we reskill and upskill Canadians? And how can really help the technology aspect? This combined with a culture of collaboration where everyone is working together is making Canada an innovation leader.”

Canadian startups and technology companies are a focal point for the Canadian’s government’s innovation approach. The federal government recently made a $25-million investment into the Creative Destruction Lab, founded at the University of Toronto, which it hopes will create as many as 22,000 jobs as well as help accelerate and support startups and AI-based companies.


Navdeep Bains on setting up long-term winning conditions for tech and innovation

Bains stressed that talent is key to future development in Canada, and cited the federal government’s recent budget as proof that the country’s resources are being directed toward the education and collaboration.

According to Bains, the government’s focus on people will have lasting importance.

“I really think that’s a key turning point for us to demonstrate success for decades to come,” he said.

Share this:
Continue Reading

Leadership

Ethics and data management key to business strategy in 2019

Published

on

business strategy
Share this:

As well as the other challenges facing businesses in 2019 and beyond, a particular focus needs to be placed onto digital ethics and data privacy, according to industry analysts Gartner. The firm outlines the top ten coming industry and technology trends in a new report.

The new Gartner document is titled “Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2019” and it takes a look into what might be in store for corporations for the next year. Three of the key trends are discussed below: ethics, privacy and connected and automated technologies.

Business ethics are needed to ensure brand loyalty

The report focuses on the new elements for businesses strategies for the coming year, with the overall message that businesses need to place individuals and society at the forefront. These types of business behaviors are seen as necessary to ensure that businesses retain a competitive edge, especially with Millennials and Generation Z. These demographics are as a whole more in tune with what businesses do in terms of corporate governance, and they will shy away from companies that do not appear to proport certain values or ethics.

For example, the most recent Deloitte Millennial Survey found that those of the Millennials and Generation Z generation place a strong emphasis upon ethical businesses and business leaders showing they care about society.

Data privacy

Many consumers have lost faith in corporations in terms of data privacy. Businesses that can show they place data privacy at the heart of their digital businesses ethics are more likely to keep customers. The signal is that customer attitudes to data privacy and protection are changing fast in both the business and consumer markets.

Consequently, and supported by a recent IBM poll, trust in a company handling data correctly is now a key consumer issue. To achieve a business culture that values data privacy requires appropriate leadership, in order to steer an ethical and transparent approach to data collection, management and use.

Connected and automated technologies

The report also has strong focus on emerging and connected technologies, such as blockchain, which provides a digital ledger that it clear and transparent; and connected services like cloud computing, which are predicated to push more responsibility for driving data back to the end users.

In addition, artificial intelligence remains of interest. AI offers a range of potential uses from assisting with product development to data extraction and analysis. However, the full capabilities of AI in terms of assisting with software development are unlikely to happen in 2019, according to the report.

What is more likely to continue, according to Gartner, is automation, especially in relation to the use of robots to replace the more mundane forms of human activity. This is, however, most likely to continue on a machine-for-person basis. The robotic concept of swarming — where desired collective behavior emerges from the interactions between the robots and interactions of robots with the environment — remains some way off.

While these technologies are useful, the report notes they have yet to achieve their full potential and organizations need to be careful when adopting them. This is because such “technologies and concepts are immature, poorly understood and unproven in mission-critical, at-scale business operations”. The adoption needs to have a firm goal placed central to any digital transformation process.

Share this:
Continue Reading

Leadership

GE prepared to invest $300 million in new CEO

Published

on

executive
Share this:

GE has made a $300 million bet on its new CEO and the performance that the board hopes he will deliver. The new CEO is Larry Culp — and success for Culp could bring considerable share benefits.

General Electric Co. will remunerate its new chief executive with up to $21 million a year for four years. To add to this there are options for issuing the new chief with hundreds of millions of dollars, with these payments tied to GE’s stock performance, according to The Wall Street Journal. The big payoff will come if GE’s shares rise at least 50 percent and stay there on average over 30 trading days between now and 2022.

Culp and culpability

Culp’s appointment follows on from outgoing CEO John Flannery. Flannery was GE’s eleventh CEO and the company’s tenth Chairman, although he only spent around one year in the role. GE ditched Flannery, according to The Financial Times, based on progress being too slow and due to a lower-than-expected profits outlook. Flannery’s tenure was the shortest of any previous leader in the company’s 126-year history. During Flannery’s year, GE’s share price fell by more than 50 percent.

Promotion from without

H. Lawrence “Larry” Culp Jr. becomes the first outsider to run GE in the company’s history. Prior to his appointment, Culp worked at Danaher Corporation in Washington, D.C. Danaher’s products are concentrated in the fields of design, manufacturing, and marketing of industrial, healthcare and consumer products.

As to why Culp has been offered such a lucrative package, the Boston Globe has the basis of an answer: “Larry Culp is a nuts-and-bolts executive with little name recognition outside of the business world, noted for turning a little-known industrial conglomerate into a hugely profitable growth machine.”

Share this:
Continue Reading

Featured