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New research predicts six key trends in the consumer IoT market

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Smart home IoT company Viomi Technology and the International Data Corporation have jointly issued a white paper that identifies key consumer trends for the Internet of Things and the smart home.

With the smart home, connected services and the Internet of Things overall gaining greater acceptance it is important for businesses to understand where the technology is heading next. Focusing on the home market, smart home Internet of Things company Viomi Technology, in collaboration with the market intelligence company International Data Corporation (IDC), has issued a white paper that signals the key consumer trends that are set to shape the home IoT market over the next few years.

The new paper is called “Consumer IoT Outlook 2025“, and as the title suggests it forecasts the primary trends in the consumer IoT market from now through to 2025. These trends are:

  • Computing capabilities of consumer IoT devices will increase rapidly. For this, artificial intelligence is vital to the future development of consumer IoT. The main developments will be with sensing technology, data acquisition capability and decision-making intelligence.
  • Different network protocols will work together as a hybrid network. The aim here is to provide consumers with stable and fast connection anywhere and anytime. This will be enhanced by 5G, and increased consumer expectations for connection anywhere and anytime.
  • Edge computing and local storage will be widely used on smart devices. This move will improve computing efficiency and personal privacy.
  • Consumer IoT devices will have more open integration in terms of technology. Interoperability should be achieved by breaking the boundaries between products, platforms, and applications.
  • Human-device interaction will be more user-friendly and feel more natural. This will be seen with applications like voice-, image-, face-, and touch-based interaction.
  • Smart devices will soon move into the stage of proliferation. The main growth area, the report suggests, will probably be in China.

The research will be presented by Viomi at the Appliances & Electronics World Expo in Shanghai, China on March 13, 2019.

At the same time, a separate report from market research firm Grand View Research predicts that the global smart home automation market will hit $130 billion by 2025, compared to $46.15 billion in 2016.

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IoT + Smart Edge Computing = Operations Intelligence

In the equation IoT + X = Operations Intelligence, what role does smart edge computing play?

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You don’t always need a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

The general premise driving the use of the Internet of Things (IoT) and data analytics to deliver intelligence is that the end actions usually have to be executed through some kind of blanket (often human) intervention. The shaky fallacy at the core of this idea is that it takes a sledgehammer to a nut in that even small adjustments to operating conditions requires a large investment of resources. Smart edge computing addresses this challenge and applies a solution that is more proportional to the size of the problem.

[Download]: Real Estate Manager Goes Digital

Whether it’s a thermostat or a light switch or a card reader, most edge devices that control today’s commercial facilities are passive and wired devices, says Datta Godbole, the chief technology officer for Honeywell Building Technologies. Smart edge computing introduces a more efficient way of corralling the power of IoT to deliver operations intelligence. Smart edge devices can act on intelligence on the frontlines and save the heavy-duty computing for the cloud.

Smart edge computing helps companies, including facility management organizations, distribute computing needs more efficiently: you execute the small changes at the edge and save the heavy lifting for the cloud. “Time critical decisions are executed quickly without going to the cloud, while cloud computing is great for analyzing long-term trends through AI algorithms,” Godbole says.

Decisions at the edge

It is this “quickly” factor, the latency that is saved, that makes smart edge computing so valuable as part of the equation IoT + smart edge computing = operations intelligence.

Imagine a commercial building packed with fire and smoke detectors. Facilities management needs to maintain and periodically inspect these devices, which involves days of intensive work. What if instead the smoke detector could signal when it’s ready for maintenance – much like your car does? “In the future, all equipment in the building will be smart and can diagnose themselves and ask for help,” Godbole says.

The IoT part of the equation comes from the many sensors measuring a variety of parameters including temperature, humidity, light, foot traffic, occupancy and more. The introduction of IoT expands the working data set so management can more finely calibrate the final experience. “If we have IoT sensors that blanket a whole building, that conduct micro-measurements of every part of the building, we get a much truer picture of what’s happening in the building and you can control air conditioning or heating accordingly,” Godbole says.

Case Study: Advancing Smart Manufacturing Operations Value with Industry 4.0 Platform

In a sense, IoT allows for both personalized comfort and efficiencies at scale. When an employee swipes her card and enters her workspace, what if IoT-embedded edge devices automatically gave her what she was looking for: a slightly warmer conference room, lighting that adjusted depending on where she was working and her favorite snacks lined up in the kitchen?

Foot traffic sensors and occupancy patterns in the long term can dictate heating and cooling requirements so management can optimize these over time.

The use of IoT in conjunction with smart edge computing will lead to a more efficient allocation of computing resources and better and faster decision-making. No longer do you need a sledgehammer for every problem, a fine scalpel will work even better.

[Download]: A New Approach to PLM

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CIRA Made a Terrible Mistake with a Domain Name Ad

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This article is sponsored content produced by Threat Intelligence Platform (TIP)—a data, tool, and API provider that specializes in automated threat detection, security analysis, and threat intelligence solutions for Fortune 1000 and cybersecurity companies.

The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) recently launched a commercial that encourages Canadians to register a “.ca” domain name instead of a “.com”. While CIRA’s campaign seems commercially sound, it has failed to meet one expectation: Doing sufficient domain name monitoring to ensure it wasn’t infringing anyone’s rights.

In fact, CIRA’s ad showed a banner with a “.com” domain name in the background — leading to a problematic situation. The registrar did not realize the domain name shown was trademarked and owned by the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and the National Association of Realtors (NAR). This incident was a terrible oversight on the domain registrar’s part, with potential legal implications for the registry.

When CIRA learned about its mistake, its representative delivered this message:

“We are really proud of, and stand behind, the ad. The reaction so far has been overwhelmingly positive. We look forward to helping as many Canadian businesses as possible get online with a .ca domain name.”

Domain names are crucial to any business with an online presence. Without a domain name, it would be impossible for an organization to send corporate emails or put up its own website. During the early days of the Internet, registering a domain name was a tedious and costly process. 

Today, however, the trouble with domain name registration lies more in that anyone can do it. Even cybercriminals can purchase and register a top-level domain (TLD) and put up malicious websites in hopes that victims would land on them and give out their personal information.

Easy-to-recall domain names related to brands have also become scarce because even individuals compete with businesses for them. Even famous brands have to deal with this challenge. 

Google, for instance, could not use alphabet.com because someone else owns it. Nissan, meanwhile, had to spend more than 20 years before it could acquire nissan.com from an individual named Uzi Nissan.

This scarcity, however, is now being alleviated by the introduction of new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) such as .bmw, .nike, and .mcdonalds along with country-code TLDs (ccTLDs) like .ca.

Despite the influx of new gTLDs and ccTLDs, however, .com domains remain the most sought after. As such, some businesses resort to convincing registrants to give up their domain names sometimes at exorbitant prices. The average price of a domain name bought from someone who already owns it is thousands of dollars. Cars.com is probably the most expensive domain to date, valued at US$872 million.

Other companies get lucky in that they find their hearts’ desires among discarded domains. In such cases, though, they should do due diligence to make sure the domains they wish to purchase were not given up for excellent reasons such as search engine results pages (SERP) and security violations. They should keep in mind that domains in Google’s blacklist, no matter how memorable, would never show up in search results because of SERP violations. Domains in security vendors’ blacklists, meanwhile, would always be blocked on computers where their solutions are installed.

To avoid ending up with domains that have a checkered past, users can use a WHOIS history checker before purchase. Such a tool would reveal everything about the domain in question. It can help future domain owners ensure that their websites do not have ties to any malicious activity, individual, or organization at any point in their life cycle.

Domain names have become more than just a means to gain online visibility. They are now unique identifiers that point to organizations’ brands. That is why it is important for all companies to make domain security a priority.

About the Author

Jonathan Zhang is the founder and CEO of Threat Intelligence Platform (TIP) — a data, tool, and API provider that specializes in automated threat detection, security analysis, and threat intelligence solutions for Fortune 1000 and cybersecurity companies. TIP is part of the Whois XML API family, a trusted intelligence vendor by over 50,000 clients.

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AI will fuel the next wave of digital transformation in Asia

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From the recently-wrapped Milken Institute Asia Summit in Singapore, president of Asia and corporate vice president at Microsoft, Ralph Haupter, spoke to Bloomberg Markets: Asia on how Artificial Intelligence will continue to disrupt the technology space and drive growth on the continent.

As it stands, an increasing number of reports are showing the importance of AI on growth on a global scale:

  • AI could contribute an additional $15.7 trillion to the global economy by 2030 (PwC)
  • The technology represents a potential impact on GDP of 26.1 percent in China (PwC)
  • 28 percent of businesses are already realizing tangible returns on their AI implementation (AI Business)

“We need to understand that AI is the next accelerator for digital transformational companies,” explained Haupter. “We did a study here in Asia and it turns out that companies really think AI will drive double on innovation and double on productivity. That’s pretty impactful.”

The study referenced by Haupter was released earlier this year, showing that AI will accelerate the rate of innovation and employee productivity improvements to nearly double in Asia Pacific by 2021. Furthermore, only 41 percent of organizations in the region have embarked on the AI journey.

Speaking to Bloomberg, Haupter cited one success story: Narayana Health in India, which uses AI visual recognition with its X-Rays. “The quality is better, the cost is down, scale is higher — that’s what technology is about. It makes me excited.”

[Learn more about Narayana’s digital transformation]

The urgency of re-skilling

Of course, a significant touchpoint when discussing the important and rise of AI on growth, is the prioritization of reskilling workers.

A recent IBM Institute for Business Value study found that “as many as 120 million workers in the world’s 12 largest economies may need to be retrained or reskilled over the next three years as a result of the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and automation.”

In his interview, Haupter is quick to point out that AI “is something that is augmenting us as human beings, and not replacing us,” emphasizing that reskilling is a clear goal on the agenda.

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