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81% of banking executives would look to collaboration for digital transformation

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According to Finextra’s The Future of Payments 2019 report, it’s been “the year of digital transformation for legacy-era brick-and-mortar banking giants.”

And collaboration is overwhelming the favored path to get there.

At EBADay, hosted by Finextra in association with the EBA, it was reported that 81% of banking executives would seek to collaborate with partners to better, more successfully execute digital transformation. 

 

While collaboration was the clearly-favored choice, some respondents did choose options for digital transformation that either kept the process in-house, or completely outsource it:

  • 8% would build a new operating layer on their own
  • 6% would outsource processes
  • 5% would create a new bank “on the side”

When asked to describe digital transformation (DX), 55% said that it means fully changing an institution’s fabric. For others, DX means:

  • Offering more innovative products while reducing costs (20%)
  • Replacing and renewing the core banking operating system (13%) 
  • Offering digital channels such as mobile (12%)

Thanks to consumer demand, banks have been forced to step up and introduce new products and services that leverage current and emerging technologies — all in the name of giving customers better choice. 

As it stands, customers of the retail banks are able to deposit cheques, transfer funds, and apply for loans via their smartphones. 

“This collaborative attitude underscores how the rise of digital banking may not need to be an all-out competition between incumbents and startups,” explains Business Insider, “and may even tilt the scales in the direction of collaboration.”

And it looks like it’s already been happening: Lloyds found that 48% of financial services they polled said they have completed acquisition deals for fintech firms, or have taken a minority or majority stake in them. 

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Alipay to Support Digital Transformation of 40 Million Service Providers in China

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Alipay, the world’s largest mobile payment platform (operated by Ant Financial Services Group) has announced a three-year plan to further open up its platform to support the digital transformation of 40 million service providers across China.

The goal is to enable these providers to develop and offer a range of lifestyle apps for food delivery, hotel booking, transport, and medical services.  

“The service sector in China is still in the nascent stages of digital transformation, and that means it has huge untapped potential,” said Ant Financial Chief Executive Officer Simon Hu in the company’s press release. “Amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, we have also seen how digital technology can be used to help service providers become more agile and respond effectively to the fast-changing market environment.”

“Building a one-stop digital lifestyle platform not only creates immense value for our users – it will also play an essential role in accelerating the digital transformation of the service industry and unlocking more growth opportunities,” added Hu.

As part of this initiative, Alipay will allow service providers to tap into in-app traffic, while AI-driven incentive programs will encourage service providers to consistently improve the customer experience. 

The press release also explains that users will be able to access personalized recommendations from newly added service sections, meaning service providers will be able to enhance their distribution efficiency.

Under the three-year plan, Alipay will also help 40 million service providers digitalize their operations, increase efficiency and reach more customers by 2030 — with the help of 50,000 Independent Software Vendors (ISVs). Currently, there are over one million on the platform. ISVs are companies that package Alipay’s technologies into solutions to meet the needs of specific industries and use cases, from consumer retail, food-and-beverage, hotels/accommodations, transportation, and medical services.

Impact of coronavirus

In the early days of the COVID-19 outbreak, the company introduced an incentive program that encouraged developers to create mini programs as a way to help users cope with the effects. These include programs that meet lifestyle needs of those working from home, therefore minimizing the need for physical contact with service providers.

In just a week, over 1200 developers responded by creating 181 contactless service mini programs on the Alipay app, for services across China — for example, grocery delivery, legal/medical advice, logistics, and public services. One program providing free medical consultation from AliHealth received an average of 700,000 daily visits.

Beijing-based grocery startup Meicai also launched a delivery mini program for Alipay users amid the coronavirus outbreak, attracting more than 800,000 new users.

Mobile use in China

According to figures from the China Internet Network Information Center, 99.1% of Chinese internet users went online via mobile devices in 2019, compared with just 24% in 2007. Thanks to this increase, the domestic service sector has begun adopting digital technologies.

The National Bureau of Statistics figures show that China’s service industry contributed to 59.4 percent of GDP growth in 2019. While the sector is clearly important to the economy, Chinese service providers still place heavy reliance on traditional brick-and-mortar. Digital technology hasn’t been fully embraced yet as a means to boost efficiency and improve customer experience.

Consumer demand for digitalized services, however, has been expanding rapidly — in 2019, the number of searches for lifestyle services within the Alipay app increased 300% compared with 2018.

As Hu explained, “Since the very beginning, Alipay’s success has always depended on the success of our partners, and that is why we believe the only way to best serve consumers is to open up our platform further, so service providers can better tap into consumer demands.”

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How BMO branch technology saves employees up to 30 minutes per day

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When it comes to banking, it comes as little surprise that customers are increasingly preferring tellerless interactions. 

A recent customer insight report from Mercator Advisory Group found that those who don’t like using mobile and online banking prefer to use self-service kiosks at physical branch locations.

Even back in 2015, a study by Source Technologies found that self-service retail banking kiosks improve operations, “reducing the time it takes to get an official check from nine minutes (using a teller) to 40 seconds – 13.5 times faster than a teller-conducted transaction.”

When banks invest in features like remote authentication and mobile deposits, it isn’t just customers who benefit — staff are able to better focus on more complex transactions, and developing relationships with clients.

“We see that more and more of our customers are migrating toward self-serve interactions, especially for the simpler, straightforward transactions,” explained Kyle Barnett, BMO’s chief operating officer for US personal and business banking, in an interview with PYMNTS. 

One of technologies implemented by BMO was a faster, real-time process for scanning and depositing cheques, saving customers from having to fill out a paper deposit slip. This has led to deposits clearing within hours instead of days. 

Another BMO implementation was its easy PIN authentication; instead of using a driver’s licenses or state-issued ID, customers use debit cards to verify their identities. The transaction is therefore accelerated, and data is aggregated instantly on the teller’s screen.

Both of these improvements were implemented in more than 500 branches by the end of 2019.

“If a customer walks in and opens up an account [during the] same interaction, they can actually leave with a fully functioning, embossed card that has their name on it,” Barnett said. 

And unlike before, when a customer was issued a temporary card and had to wait for the fully-functioning replacement to arrive in the mail, “they also get the PIN right there as part of the account opening, and can even set up a custom PIN if they want at the ATM.”

With the in-branch experience changing, and customers requiring fewer interactions with tellers, the result has been “really freeing up our branch bankers to have more time to dedicate to customers, and have better holistic conversations, and create more personalized recommendations.” 

One case study found that employees have saved between 15 and 30 minutes per day on processing forms. Multiply that by the number of employees within BMO, and you get a major win for efficiency and time saving. 

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Why private label banking apps and products are on the rise

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Private labeling has long been a pervasive strategy in retail, where products are made by third party manufacturers and sold under a retailer’s name. The cost to manufacture is often much lower than reselling another brand name, resulting in higher margins and increased revenue for sellers.

Retailers who implement this strategy also maintain wholesale control of the brand, including packaging and pricing, which generates product exclusivity as well as promotes customer recognition of and loyalty to the brand.

Possibly the biggest benefit of private labels, however, is that they eliminate the pains of having to design and build a new product — especially when entering a new market. By outsourcing the entire process and leaving those details to the experts, sellers can instead focus on what they excel at: branding and marketing the finished product.

Because the benefits of this strategy are so multifaceted, it’s no wonder private labeling is moving beyond consumer goods and gaining traction in service-based industries. Businesses looking to develop new offerings and product functionalities can now easily outsource entire technology stacks and tedious regulatory administration.

As tech giants like Apple, Amazon, and Google deepen their financial services plays, banking and personal finance tools have become a prime opportunity for fintechs and smaller firms to leverage private labeling to compete, and for established players to unlock new revenue streams.

Here’s a look inside how private labeling is transforming the banking industry— and which products are on the rise.

What is white label banking?

White label banking is another term for private label banking or banking-as-a-service (BaaS), in which banks open up their application program interfaces (APIs) to let third parties build their own financial products with existing infrastructure. White label banking accelerates the builder’s go-to-market strategy by removing regulatory, legal, and technical obstacles.

White label banking services

White label banking services enable fintechs and third parties to showcase a sleek, company-branded frontend, while leveraging an established bank’s license, regulatory compliance, and technology on the backend to offer core banking features that rival major institutions’.

Common white label banking services include:

  • Savings and checking accounts
  • Current accounts
  • Debit and credit cards
  • Simplified bill payments
  • Online payment transfer systems
  • Personal loans
  • Mortgages
  • Insurance
  • Bank statements with transaction details
  • Balance notifications

White label banking apps

Some examples of mobile banking apps built with white label features include:

  • ADIB
  • Albaraka Mobil
  • Azlo
  • Börse Stuttgart App
  • Chime
  • Compte CO2
  • Digit
  • Dozens
  • Knotist business banking
  • MoneyLion
  • Nationwide Mobile
  • Qapital
  • Qonto
  • Score Kompass
  • Simple
  • Spendesk
  • Stash
  • Tomorrow
  • Trade Republic
  • Van Lanschot
  • Vitesse Mobile
  • Xero Accounting & Invoices

Future of white label banking services

Across industries, digital technologies are democratizing information to spur more competition and innovation. Because of this, the trend towards “open access” will only become more pervasive. In the banking industry, particularly, the open banking movement has been unfurling from its epicenter in the UK and stretching across the globe for the past few years.

White label banking and BaaS technology are no longer brand new technologies in the industry, but firms that get involved now will still be ahead of the curve by the time regulation becomes mainstream. The UK’s Competition and Markets Authority has already enrolled the nine biggest banks and building societies in its Open Banking Directory, and others are coming soon. After that, it won’t be long before other countries follow suit with their own regulations.

Per Accenture estimates, €61 billion ($70 billion) or 7% of total banking revenue in Europe will be associated with open banking-enabled activities by 2020. Incumbent banks around the world that invest in open banking platforms now – before it’s mandated – will be rewarded with new revenue streams, an early boost in demand, partnerships with tech-savvy fintechs, and an overall competitive advantage against newcomers in the space.

To stay ahead of trends like white label banking, Business Insider Intelligence is launching a Banking coverage area in September. Tailored for top decision-makers in the financial services industry, this vertical covers digital transformation across the industry, including open banking and BaaS, consumer and business banking, mobile and online banking, digital account opening, and neobanks.

This article originally appeared on Business Insider and is reprinted with permission. To read the original article, visit this link.

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