Connect with us

Technology

When IoT meets manufacturing

Published

on

Share this:

By: Frank Antonysamy

One of the more negative iconic images of the Industrial Revolution was of child workers being sent into coal mines. Thankfully, that’s an age long behind us.

Our own era promises a different revolution: one in which miners no longer need to descend into the mine shaft, wield a pick, endure suffocating temperatures or constant jarring vibration, or risk their lives for underground goods like coal, gold or diamonds.

Related: How manufacturers can unlock value with IOT analytics

Tomorrow’s mines will increasingly rely on sensor-equipped, software-driven machinery, a complex technology evolution enabled by the movement toward the Internet of Things (IoT). And it’s not just mining that’s benefiting from the IoT.

While the technology sector conjures an image of silicon chips and clean rooms, processors and analytics, sensors and the cloud, manufacturers across sectors are moving toward a world of IoT-enabled intelligent products and systems.

Intelligent Solutions: There’s Gold in Them Hills

Ordering dinner through an app, calling Lyft to get to a restaurant or paying bills through a smartphone are the accepted conventions of today’s digital world. Now a new technology wave is transforming remote-operated or software-driven equipment into IoT-enabled, autonomous, self-learning machinery that reacts to changing circumstances in real time.

Driverless heavy machinery is already functioning at multinational metals and mining company Rio Tinto’s massive open-pit iron mining operations at Pilbara in Western Australia, with 400-plus-ton trucks larger than two-story houses hauling massive loads of ore and waste material. Operated from a control room hundreds of miles away, the trucks work alongside other vehicles and heavy machinery, adjusting in real time to a mine’s changing layout as ore and waste are removed.

Soon, most new mines will use pilot-less drilling machines at the coalface, equipped with sensors that allow them to follow seams of ore, monitor temperature and air quality, detect vibrations that may signal danger, and make sensor-informed decisions based on complex risk-driven algorithms.

Trucks, drilling machines, even transportation systems will be interoperable automated systems — in effect, an amalgamation of specialized systems in a single, highly complex machine. The result: more efficient operations, fewer workers exposed to risk, better performance and an improved bottom line.

The Changing Face of Manufacturing

Today’s manufacturers are actively leveraging IoT initiatives to realize internal process efficiencies. Many are changing how they design their production facilities to transform their business – streamlining production and improving productivity.

Consider a renowned heavy equipment manufacturer that has leveraged IoT in its production lines, slashing the time it takes to produce customized equipment at its U.S. facility from 42 minutes to 22 minutes. It did so by automating factory line processes and equipping them with beacons and Intel’s Retail Sensor Platform integrated with Microsoft’s Azure IoT platform. The company has doubled production times, improved quality compliance at the workstation level and boosted employee utilization by 20%.

[Download]: How manufacturers can unlock value with IOT analytics

Increasingly, the definition of a product is evolving to a broader, customer-centric construct, in which sensors gather data on customers’ use of products and their performance, enabling predictive maintenance, insight into future product enhancements, even customer-focused features and improvements, along with better customer service. All are based on deeper insights into users’ behavior, collected and aggregated from the products’ sensors. By outfitting products with smart sensors and connecting them to key systems and networks – and even to each other – manufacturers are replacing transaction-oriented relationships with whole-lifecycle engagement.

An Expanding IoT Influence

With its proven efficiency and productivity gains, it’s no wonder the demand for IoT devices is exploding. According to IDC, 60% of global manufacturers are using analytics to sense and analyze data from connected products and manufacturing. By 2018, IDC says, the proliferation of advanced, purpose-built, analytic applications aligned with IoT will result in 15% productivity improvements for manufacturers regarding innovation delivery and supply chain performance.

Mining? Yes. Oil and gas drilling? Sure. Manufacturing? Certainly. But IoT is not limited to these sectors. Many companies in consumer-facing sectors will also experience change from IoT, from banking to retail to airlines. Connected products and smart manufacturing are here to stay, and they’ll be all around us.

[Download]: How manufacturers can unlock value with IOT analytics

This article originally appeared on the Digitally Cognizant Blog

Share this:

Technology

New IT infrastructure for Gilbane includes LLMs, payment automation, and unified tech departments

A look at 153-year old real estate titan Gilbane’s digital transformation

Published

on

Share this:

Canada’s construction industry has been slower to get on the digital transformation train. Yet virtual design and automation presents serious opportunities for the industry to evolve with digital transformation. 

Research shows that more than 80% of construction companies have room to improve their data capabilities, and the most commonly cited benefits of digital transformation were increased productivity, customer experience and staff safety.

One company that made it happen is Gilbane — a U.S.-based real estate development company worth more than $6.5 billion, with family roots that persevere to this day. In fact, they even have employees in the family’s sixth generation. Despite the “legacy” mindset in the company’s fabric (it’s 153 years old) and business industry, Gilbane boosted risk management and productivity under a brand new modular IT infrastructure. 

Here’s how they did it (and how you can, too):

Unify all digital initiatives under one leader

The company created a position that was responsible for overseeing the progress on multiple tech initiatives, including AI, analytics, IT, and cybersecurity. This helped them avoid the risk of wasted budgets through silos and miscommunication. 

“We believe this structure is the most effective to bring together our data and technology resources to drive transformation and get a real return on invested capital.”Karen Higgins-Carter, Chief Digital Information Officer (CDIO)

Invest in analytics and AI for risk management

Safety is a primary concern in the construction industry. Despite improvements in safety measures, equipment, and training, the construction industry still experiences high rates of death and injury. In fact, in 2022 the National Safety Council ranked the construction industry in the top four most dangerous, noting that it experienced the most workplace deaths.

Gilbane’s team is investing in analytics and AI with large language mode experiments to help them identify similar trends that indicate potential unsafe characteristics on a worksite, Higgins-Carter told CIO. “In construction, our teams are managing the construction of hundreds of projects happening at any one time,” she said. “Our analytics capabilities identify potentially unsafe conditions so we can manage projects more safely and mitigate risks.”

“To help us manage risk, I need to understand the leading indicators of risk on a job, like attrition or high volumes of change order.”Karen Higgins-Carter, Chief Digital Information Officer (CDIO)

Automate payment processing with operation-specific triggers

Higgins-Carter told CIO the company recently piloted an automated payment program for Gilbane to pay subcontractors more efficiently. Powered by videos and photos of work completed as triggers, payments are automatically dispensed to the necessary parties. 

Educate the entire team and inform new processes with their experience

Hold meetings and training sessions to ensure executives and employees  understand the benefits and functions of any new tech or business processes. 

“We can’t deliver technology if we don’t understand our employees’ experience. If I go out to a job site once a month, then my team will too.”Karen Higgins-Carter, Chief Digital Information Officer (CDIO)

Read the full article on CIO here.

Share this:
Continue Reading

Events

The Northern Lights Technology & Innovation Forum navigates AI, economic concerns and upskilling in Alberta

Panelists dive into how innovation and collaboration may help navigate the changing industry landscapes

Published

on

Share this:

While rapid advancements in AI are reshaping industries worldwide, they’ve sparked discussions about innovation and community resilience through ongoing economic challenges. At this year’s Northern Lights Technology and Innovation Forum, panelists explored how technology could drive positive adaptation.

​​Moderated by the Calgary Economic Development’s Geraldine Anderson, the panel featured:

  • Mark Little, co-founder and CEO Jotson Inc, and board member of General Fusion
  • Anna Baird, culture and innovation evangelist at Google
  • Dan Semmens, SVP and head of data and IT at ATB Financial
  • Arthur Kent, Canadian journalist and author
  • Joy Romero, executive advisor innovation at Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL)

Approximately 250 attendees gathered for the forum at the Calgary Petroleum Club on Feb. 8. Filled with industry leaders and burgeoning entrepreneurs, the forum focused on collaboration and knowledge sharing in the tech sector.

Over the past five years, Calgary has seen a 22 per cent increase in tech talent and total tech jobs, emerging as one of North America’s top markets for young tech professionals.

“The talent pool here is amazing,” said ​​John Givens, vice president of sales at C3 AI and one of the event’s organizers. “So how do we leverage our talent here? How do we share that knowledge?”

In response, this year’s forum included the inaugural “Mentors and Makers” initiative, where a dozen industry experts pinned green buttons to their lapels, signaling to anyone in the crowd that they’re open to a conversation.

Shawn Mahoney, another event organizer and co-founder of Spare Parts & Gasoline, said in his opening remarks that the initiative speaks to “creating the new innovators that we need to solve tomorrow’s problems.”

And with that, the panel took the stage to dig into the big questions: What are the challenges and opportunities for Alberta as a growing tech market? How will AI continue to change industries across the board? And if it does, will that be a bad thing?

The Alberta advantage

The panel conversation was kicked off by the first question asked by moderator Geraldine Anderson: “What is the Alberta mindset, or the ‘Alberta advantage?’” 

Mark Little. Photo by DX Journal / Digital Journal

Mark Little, co-founder and CEO Jotson Inc, said Alberta has a lot going for it — including having the highest GDP in Canada, a younger population, and high education levels — but those aren’t the advantages that stand out to him.

“There’s a resilience and an entrepreneurial spirit here,” he said. “As a result of that, we’re seeing innovation … I think 10 to 15 years from now we’re going to lead this country in innovation and it’ll be every sector you could imagine.”

Hailing from Vancouver and the only panelist not based in Calgary, Google’s Anna Baird said she considers herself an honorary Albertan based on the “sheer grittiness and roll up your sleeves and work together” attitude she’s witnessed. 

“The grittiness takes us into innovation,” said Baird. “We’re willing to try new things, we’re willing to fail — hopefully fast and cheaply, as is Google’s ethos. But we’re also willing to borrow with pride and give kudos to the people we’re borrowing the pride from so we can have building blocks.” 

The panelists’ discussion kept coming back to the importance of adaptability, innovation, and collaboration. While the province faces significant hurdles, including global market fluctuations and environmental concerns, they spoke with optimism about the potential to emerge stronger by investing in the future.

Dan Semmens, SVP and head of data and IT at ATB Financial, calls it an “opportunity” for both the province and country to focus on investing in the next generation.

“I think the opportunity there is continuing to invest in our most precious resource, which is our young people,” he said. 

When it comes to AI, “it’s on all of us” to level up our own skills

Joy Romero. Photo by DX Journal / Digital Journal

AI is already impacting most industries globally, and it shows no signs of slowing down. But it’s not new either.

Joy Romero, executive advisor of innovation at Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL), said she was using AI neural networks 20 years ago to take ecological data and process it through oil sands facilities. 

“Why?” she asked. “Because that would allow us to improve our processing and our productivity … So for me, digital is our world. That’s productivity.”

The day of the panel, Google announced that Gemini Ultra 1.0, the largest version of their large language model, is being released to the public. 

Baird was asked about the implications of the new AI model, and while she acknowledged there will be challenges, she maintained that “the train has left the station.”

“It’s on all of us here in the room to level up our own skills,” she says. “With an announcement like Gemini, like you have to get in there, you have to play, you have to try.”

Anna Baird. Photo by DX Journal / Digital Journal

Transitioning to the realm of media and journalism, Canadian journalist Arthur Kent highlighted the increasing role of AI in newsrooms. From assisting journalists in gathering and analyzing data to content creation, journalists are experimenting with AI for efficiency and detecting false information.

“We can become even better if we harness artificial intelligence to do that,” said Kent. “So we constantly have to be developing and pushing ourselves forward, to keep pace with this.”

However, he emphasized the critical role of journalists in maintaining integrity and discerning between fact and fiction in an era of AI-generated content. 

“Journalism is always going to be a human process, because journalism is based on their location, and verification, verifying leads, tips, and figuring out rumour from fact,” said Kent. “So far, none of the machines that I’ve seen associated with artificial intelligence, have those human characteristics. However, there is also that human aspect called temptation.”

Arthur Kent. Photo by DX Journal / Digital Journal

In the financial services industry, Semmens said the impact of generative AI “poses an existential risk” to the relationship banks have with their clients. 

Despite this, he says incorporating AI technology into banking is “an incredible opportunity” to personalize experiences for customers more effectively and efficiently, and he expects to see a lot of changes in open banking in the next three to five years. 

“With all the disinformation that is out there, a trusted source is going to be a high commodity,” he said. “And so I think in banking, being a heavily regulated industry, there is an opportunity for us to really show up from that standpoint.”

Dan Semmens. Photo by DX Journal / Digital Journal

An innovation forum’s charitable roots

The Northern Lights Technology and Innovation Forum’s story begins over a decade ago. The organizers, including Givens, first banded together for the Gordie Howe C.A.R.E.S. Hockey Pro-Am Tournament in support of Alzheimer’s research and education. 

As the cause drew more attention they opted to expand the tournament into the forum as a way to expand their reach. All of the event proceeds go to Gordie Howe C.A.R.E.S. Centre for the Alzheimer’s Research and Education Society — and this year they broke their record, raising a minimum of $40,000 thanks in part to a funding match made by Google. 

“It’s amazing,” Givens said at the end of the night. “I always knew the potential of our community. And I explained to people that the community is the draw … It’s about education. It’s about doing the right thing. It’s about just finding ways for other people to get involved in doing the same thing. There’s enough energy there. Now we just have to harness it.”


DX Journal is an official media partner of the Northern Lights Technology and Innovation Forum.

Share this:
Continue Reading

Business

Generative AI fascinates many, but how are businesses addressing the societal effects and talent gaps?

A look at Deloitte’s latest study of the state of AI in 2024

Published

on

Share this:

Across the globe, 2023 was heralded as generative AI’s breakout year, and it hasn’t really slowed down since. So now experts are asking what AI trends will come this year and what the business impacts will be.

Tech and finance consulting giant Deloitte recently studied the state of generative AI in 2024, examining common use cases and goals, as well as broader societal implications. 

Here are some highlights from the report, as well as practical tips to leverage AI safely in your organization: 

Generative AI for more productivity and efficiency

The research surveyed more than 2,800 leaders across various organizations currently piloting or implementing generative AI. Most (62%) cited emotions of excitement, as well as fascination (46%), while 30% reported feeling uncertain around generative AI.

The majority saw the technology as a tool to gain more efficiency within their businesses, along with these cost benefits: 

  • Improve efficiency and productivity: 56%
  • Reduce costs: 35%
  • Improve existing products and services: 29%

From the respondents who sought more productivity, here’s where they plan to reinvest in that newfound efficiency: 

  • Encourage innovation and growth: 29%
  • Shift workers from lower-value to higher-value tasks: 26%
  • Uncover new ideas and insights: 19%

Talent still a barrier to successful generative AI adoption

Less than half of the respondents cited having sufficient employee expertise or education on generative AI, with about 55% planning to improve their learning and development strategy in the next one to two years. 

This is a consistent challenge that we’ve seen across multiple research studies, including IBM’s for the Canadian market

So how can an organization turn these plans into action? According to the respondents, the top three investments are being made in:

  • Generative AI fluency and education: 74%
  • AI recruitment and hiring: 74%
  • Reskilling: 73%

Global collaboration and governance needed for equity in generative AI

The IMF recently found a whopping 40% of jobs will be affected by AI globally, with more advanced economies seeing that number jump to 60%. The advanced economies see the tech as a compliment, while lower-income countries and emerging markets experience more job replacement. 

Will this disparity contribute to a wealth gap? Many of Deliotte’s respondents seem to think so, with 51% saying they expect generative AI to increase economic inequality.

The majority of respondents agreed that responsible AI development requires more global collaboration (72%) and governance (78%). 

Deloitte suggests these results reflect an understanding that generative AI could be too powerful for individual organizations to regulate themselves — but that doesn’t absolve them from behaving responsibly.

For individual businesses, this means paying close attention to government guidelines on responsible AI use and research on AI’s effects over time. Additionally, collaborating and sharing information across different businesses, industries, and even countries can help maintain responsible use of AI in society.

While companies are racing to keep up with these rapidly evolving AI solutions, “the key is to maintain a beginner’s mindset” reads the report. No matter how much of an expert you think you are, there’s always more to learn.

Read the full of the report here

Share this:
Continue Reading

Featured