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Why Big Business Should Proactively Build for Privacy

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This article explores the rise of Privacy by Design (PbD) from the basic framework, to its inclusion in the GDPR, to its application in business practices and infrastructure especially in the wake of Artificial Intelligence.

We had the pleasure of sitting down with Dr. Ann Cavoukian, former 3-Term Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, and currently Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, leading the Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada to discuss this massive shift that will upend current business practices. We’ve also sought responses from top execs from AI start-ups, and enterprise to address the current hurdles and future business implications of Privacy by Design. This article includes contributions from Scott Bennet, a colleague researching privacy and GDPR implications on emerging technology and current business practices.

I call myself an anti-marketer, especially these days. My background has predominantly come from database marketing and the contextualization of data to make more informed decisions to effectively sell people more stuff. The data that I saw, whether it be in banking, loyalty programs, advertising and social platforms — user transactions, digital behaviour, interactions, conversations, profiles — were sewn together to create narratives about individuals and groups, their propensities, their intents and their potential risk to the business.

While it was an established practice to analyze this information in the way that we did, the benefit was largely to businesses and to the detriment of our customers. How we depicted people was based on the data they created, based on our own assumptions that, in turn, informed the analysis and ultimately, created the rules which governed the data and the decisions. Some of these rules unknowingly were baked in unintended bias from experience and factors that perpetuated claims of a specific cluster or population.

While for many years I did not question the methods we used to understand and define audiences, it’s clear that business remained largely unchecked, having used this information freely with little accountability and legal consequence.

As data becomes more paramount and as AI analyzes and surfaces meaning at greater speeds, the danger of perpetuating these biases becomes even more serious and will inflict greater societal divisions if measures are not put in place and relentlessly enforced.

Recently, I met my maker. Call it atonement for the many years I manipulated data as a marketer. We had the honour of talking Privacy with an individual I had admired for years. Dr. Ann Cavoukian, in my view, will drive a discussion across industry that will make business stand up and listen.

Remember when Canada’s Privacy Commissioner took on Facebook?

Ann Cavoukian has been an instrumental force in spreading awareness of Privacy, which brought her front in centre on the world stage, pitted directly against Facebook in 2008. Back then the federal Privacy Commissioner alleged that 22 practices violated the Canadian Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). This eventually led to an FTC settlement with Facebook that mandated an increased transparency with its users, requiring their explicit consent before “enacting changes that override their privacy settings.”

Ann Cavoukian is a household name in technology and business. As a three-term Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, Canada, she has jettisoned the privacy discussion for a few decades. Today that discussion has reached a fever pitch as the EU General Data Protection and Regulation (GDPR), which came into effect May 25, 2018, includes Cavoukian’s long-advocated creation, Privacy by Design (PbD). This will raise the bar dramatically and any company or platform who does business with the EU, will need to comply with these standards. At the heart of GDPR are these guiding principles when collecting, storing and processing personal consumer information:

  • Lawfulness, fairness and transparency
  • Purpose limitation
  • Data minimization
  • Accuracy
  • Storage limitation
  • Integrity and confidentiality (security)
  • Accountability

Privacy by Design’s premise is to proactively embed privacy at every stage in the creation of new products or services in a way that’s fair and ethical. Cavoukian argues that by implementing PbD, companies would, in effect, be well on their way to complying with the GDPR.

What Makes this Moment Ripe for Privacy by Design?

In the 90’s the web was growing exponentially. Commerce, online applications, and platforms were introducing a new era that would dramatically change business and society. Ann Cavoukian, at this time, was in her first term as Privacy Commissioner of Ontario. She witnessed this phenomenon and was concerned it was going to grow dramatically, and in an era of ubiquitous computing, increasing online connectivity and massive social media, she surmised that privacy needed to be developed as a model of prevention, not one which simply “asked for forgiveness later.”

Imagine going to your doctor, and he tells you that you have some signs of cancer developing and says, “We’ll see if it gets worse and if it does, we’ll send you for some chemo”. What an unthinkable proposition! I want it to be equally unthinkable that you would let privacy harms develop and just wait for the breach, as opposed to preventing them from occurring. That’s what started PbD.

In 2010, at the International Conference of Data Protection Authorities and Privacy Commissioners in Europe, Cavoukian advanced the resolution that PbD should complement regulatory compliance, to mitigate the potential harms. It was unanimously passed. The reason?

Everyone saw this was just the tip of the iceberg in identifying the privacy harms, and we were unable to address all the data breaches and privacy harms that were evading our detection because the sophistication of perpetrators meant that the majority of breaches were remaining largely unknown, unchallenged and unregulated. As a result, PbD became a complement to the current privacy regulation, which was no longer sustainable as the sole method of ensuring future privacy.

These days the issue of data security has gotten equal, if not more, airplay. Cavoukian argues:

When you have an increase in terrorist incidents like San BernadinoCharlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, and in Manchester, the pendulum spins right back to: Forget about privacy — we need security. Of course we need security — but not to the exclusion of privacy!

I always say that Privacy is all about control — personal control relating to the uses of your own data. It’s not about secrecy. It drives me crazy when people say ‘Well, if you have nothing to hide, what’s the problem?’ The problem is that’s NOT what freedom is about. Freedom means YOU get to decide, as a law-abiding citizen, what data you want to disclose and to whom — to the government, to companies, to your employer.

Pew Research conducted an Internet Study post-Snowden to get a consumer pulse on individual privacy. Key findings cited:

There is widespread concern about surveillance by both government and business:
• 91% of adults agreed that consumers had lost control over their personal information;
• 80% of social network users are concerned about third parties accessing their data;
• 80% of adults agreed that Americans should be concerned about government surveillance.

Context is Key:

And while there are those who understand they are trading their information for an expectation of value, they should be fully informed of how that value is extracted from their data. Cavoukian cautions:

Privacy is not a religion. If you want to give away your information, be my guest, as long as YOU make the decision to do that. Context is key. What’s sensitive to me may be meaningless to you and vice versa… At social gatherings, even my doctors won’t admit they’re my doctors! That’s how much they protect my privacy. That is truly wonderful! They go to great lengths to protect your personal health information.

The importance of selling the need for privacy includes persistent education. Unless people have been personally affected, many don’t make the connection. Does the average person know the implications of IoT devices picking up the “sweet nothings” they’re saying to their spouse or their children? When they realize it, they usually vehemently object.

Context surfaces the importance of choice. It is no longer an all-or-nothing game subsumed under a company’s terms and conditions where one click, “Accept” automatically gives full permission. Those days are over.

And while some can object to analyzing and contextualization for insurance purposes, they may allow their personal health history to be included in an anonymized manner for research to understand cancers endemic to their particular region.

Context is a matter of choice; freedom of choice is essential to preserving our freedom.

Privacy Does Not Equal Secrecy

Cavoukian emphasizes that privacy is not about having something to hide. Everyone has spheres of personal information that are very sensitive to them, which they may or may not wish to disclose them.

You must have the choice. You have to be the one to make the decision. That’s why the issue of personal control is so important.

I extracted this slide from Ann Cavoukian’s recent presentation:

The <ahref=”https://www.wired.co.uk/article/china-social-credit” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow noopener noreferrer noopener”>Chinese Social Credit System was created to develop more transparency and improve trustworthiness among its citizens. It’s a dystopia we do not want. China is a clear surveillance society that contradicts free society’s values. Cavoukian crystalizes the notion that privacy forms the foundation of our freedom. If you value freedom, you value privacy.

Look at Germany. It’s no accident that Germany is the leading privacy and data protection country in the world. It’s no accident they had to endure the abuses of the Third Reich and the complete cessation of their privacy and their freedom. And when that ended, they said, ‘Never again will we allow the state to strip us of our privacy — of our freedom!’ And they have literally stood by that.

Post-Snowden, I wrote this: The NSA, Privacy and the Blatant Realization: Nothing You Do Online is Private and referenced a paragraph written by Writynga in his response to Zuckerberg’s view at the time 2012 that privacy was no longer a social norm:

We like to say that we grew up with the Internet, thus we think that the Internet is all grown up. But it’s not. What is intimacy without privacy? What is a democracy without privacy?…Technology makes people stupid. It can blind you to what your underlying values are and need to be. Are we really willing to give away our constitutional and civil liberties that we fought so hard for? People shed blood for this, to not live in a surveillance society. We looked at the Stasi and said, ‘That’s not us.

The will of the people has demanded more transparency.

But we don’t want a state of surveillance that eerily feels like we’re living in a police state. There has to be a balance between ensuring the security of the nation and the containment of our civil liberties.

People will have Full Transparency… Full Control… Anytime

Since the passing of Privacy by Design (PbD) as an international standard in 2010 to complement privacy regulation, PbD has been translated into 40 languages. The approach has been modified to include the premise that efforts to ensure individual privacy can be achieved while developing consumer trust and improved revenue opportunities for business within a Positive Sum paradigm. Cavoukian is convinced this is the practical way forward for business:

We can have privacy and meet business interests, security and public safety … it can’t be an either/or proposition. I think it’s the best way to proceed, in a positive-sum, win/win manner, thereby enabling all parties to gain.

Privacy by Design’s Foundational Principles include:

  1. Proactive not Reactive: preventive not remedial
  2. Privacy as the default setting
  3. Privacy embedded into design
  4. Full functionality: positive sum, not zero-sum
  5. End-to-end security: full lifecycle protection
  6. Visibility and transparency: keep it open
  7. Respect for user privacy: keep it user-centric

Cavoukian contends that Principle #2, Privacy by Default is critical and, of all the foundational principles, is the hardest one since it demands the most investment and effort: with explicit requirements that change how the data is collected, used and disclosed, and will result in data policy and process alterations including new user-centric privacy controls.

Article 21 also states individuals have the “right to object” to the processing of their personal information at any time. This includes for use in direct marketing and profiling:

“The controller shall no longer process the personal data unless the controller demonstrates compelling legitimate grounds for the processing which override the interests, rights, and freedoms of the data subject.”

The business must be more explicit and go much further, beyond the traditional disclosure and terms of service. Purpose specification and use limitation require organizations to be explicit about the information it requires, for what purpose, and must elicit consent specifically for that purpose and that purpose alone. Later on, if a secondary use transpires, the organization will require the user consent once again. If disclosure is key to transparency, businesses will need to find a way to do this while mitigating consent fatigue.

Article 17 suggests a much stronger user right that belies current business practices: The Right to Erasure (“the right to be forgotten”)

The data subject shall have the right to obtain from the controller the erasure of personal data concerning him or her without undue delay and the controller shall have the obligation to erase personal data without undue delay.

While this statute will have exceptions like data that establishes the data subject as an entity: through health records and banking information, behaviour, transactions, future analysis in profiling, and contextual models are fair game for “the right to be forgotten.” The advent of the GDPR has provided business a glimpse of the potential impacts where companies experienced customer record volumes drop an average of 20% for customers who did not explicitly opt-in.

This is a truly user-centric system. Make no mistake, Privacy by Design will challenge current practices and upend current infrastructures.

This privacy UI simulation (IBM: Journey to Compliance) displays how potential user controls will work in real time and the extent to which the user can grant consent based on different contexts. This level of user access will require a data repository to purge user information, but must be configured with the flexibility to redeploy the data into systems down the road, should the user decide to revert.

 

Can Privacy by Design Create a Positive-Sum Existence for Business?
If you had asked me a year ago, I would have argued that Privacy by Design

is not realistic for business adoption, let alone, acceptance. It will will upend process, structure and policy. However, within the mandate of GDPR this is an inevitability.

We asked Ann Cavoukian to consider business practices today. Both Google and Facebook have received enormous fines in wake of the GDPR to the tune of $9.3 billion. Because of the recent Cambridge Analytica data breach, Facebook is investing millions in tools and resources to minimize future occurrences. It’s recent Q2 stock plummet took the market by surprise but for Zuckerberg, he made it clear they would be taking a performance hit for a few quarters in order to improve the platform for its users… not for its shareholders. While they are a beacon of how companies should behave, this clear “ask forgiveness later” model negated any appearance that this strategy was nothing less than altruistic.

Emily Sharpe, Privacy Policy Manager at Facebook contends that in preparation for the GDPR, they paid particular attention to the Article 29 Working Party’s Transparency Guidance:

We have prepared for the past 18 months to ensure we meet the requirements of the GDPR. We have made our policies clearer, our privacy settings easier to find and introduced better tools for people to access, download, and delete their information. In the run up to GDPR we asked people to review key privacy information which was written in plain language, as well as make choices on three important topics. Our approach complies with the law, follows recommendations from privacy and design experts, and is designed to help people understand how the technology works and their choices.

Cavoukian pointed to a study by IBM with the Ponemon Institutethat brought awareness to the cost of data breaches: It reports that the global average cost of a data breach is up 6.4 percent over the previous year to $3.86 million per incident. On a per record basis, the average cost for each record lost rose by 4.8% to $148. As Cavoukian points out, these costs will continue to rise if you maintain Personally Identifiable Information (PII) at rest.

The PbD solution requires a full end-to-end solution which includes both privacy and security:

  1. IT systems;
  2. accountable business practices; and
  3. networked infrastructure.

How Do You Address the Advertisers Who Successfully Monetize Data Today?

What do you say to advertisers and publishing platforms who play in this $560-billion industry? We can’t stop progress. The more data out there, the more demand from willing buyers to extract meaning from it. On the other hand, given the fallout from Facebook, some advertisers have been grey or black listed from advertising on the platform because of questionable practices or content. The platform changes have also significantly curbed ad reach opportunities for current advertisers. This domino effect is now compounded with mandates from GDPR to garner explicit consent and create greater transparency of data use. Ann Cavoukian said this:

The value of data is enormous. I’m sorry but advertising companies can’t assume they can do anything they want with people’s data anymore. I sympathize with them. I really do; their business model will change dramatically. And that is hard to take so I genuinely feel bad for them. But my advice is: that business model is dying so you have to find a way to transform this so you involve your customers, engage them in a consensual model where benefits will accrue to customers as well. Context is key. Give individuals the choice to control their information and gain their consent to exchange it for something they value from you.

Mary Meeker’s “Paradox of Privacy” points to the consumer’s increasing demand for products and services that are faster, easy, convenient and affordable. This requires systems that can leverage personal information to make this a reality for the consumer. Increased customization is the expectation but brings with it increased business risk. As long as current business practices persist, according to Cavoukian, it leaves their business vulnerable to, as we’ve witnessed, incessant data breaches and cyber attacks. Equifax and Target are two cases in point.

Communication with the data subject needs to be a win/win (positive sum). Can the business provide the necessary value, while respecting the choices dictated by the individual? When AI becomes more pervasive this will become even more challenging as streaming data will require more real-time interfaces and applications that allow access and individual configuration of data types across various contexts and vertical uses.

I asked a few executives from various data start-ups and from established enterprise businesses, who have had considerable business to consumer experience from advertising to social technology to network platforms, to weigh in on the privacy debate:

Josh Sutton, CEO of Agorai, was also former Global Head for Data and AI at Publicis.Sapient. In an advertising industry which drives hundreds of millions in revenue, the quest to build consumer relevance comes at a cost. This proliferates as more companies look to artificial intelligence to drive precision:

Data is clearly one of the most valuable assets in the world today — especially with the growing importance of artificial intelligence (AI) which relies on massive amounts of data. Data privacy needs to be incorporated into the fabric of how these technologies work in order for society to get the most benefit from AI. To me, data privacy means having the ability to control when and why data that you own is used — not the ability to keep it secret which is a far easier task. For that to happen, there needs to be open and transparent marketplaces where people and companies can sell data that they create, as well as a consistent set of regulations for how companies can use data.

Dr. Nitin Mayande, PhD, Chief Scientist of Tellagence, and former Data Scientist at Nike concurs with Josh Sutton. Nitin had been studying social network behavior for years and understands the need to transform current approaches:

Sooner or later I envision a data marketplace — a supply side and a demand side. Today, companies leverage data at the user’s expense and monetize it. The end user does not experience any real economic benefit. Imagine a time when data becomes so valuable the individual can have full control and become the purveyor of his/her own information.

For Dana Toering, Chief Revenue Officer at Yroo and former Managing Director at Adobe Advertising Cloud, his career saw the emergence of ad platforms, which heavily relied on treasure troves of data to gain increasing granularity for ad targeting:

As an entire ecosystem I feel we are just now coming to terms with the evolution of value exchange that was established between end users and digital publishers and software developers starting in October 1994 when Hotwired.com ran the internet’s first banner ad. The monetization of audiences through advertising and wide-spread data harvesting of the same audiences in exchange for ‘free’ content or software has enabled the meteoric growth of the internet and the businesses that are built around it but has also enabled massive amounts of fraud and nefarious activity. Thankfully we are at a tipping point where corporations/brands and users alike are taking back data ownership and demanding transparency, as well as consent and accountability. Defining and managing the core tenets of this value exchange will become even more important (and complex) in the future with the rise of new technologies and associated tools. So the time is now to get it right so both businesses and users can benefit long term.

I have had curious discussions with Dr. Sukant Khurana, Scientist heading the Artificial Intelligence, Data Science, and Neurophysiology laboratory at CSIR-CDRI, India. As an entrepreneur also working on various disruptive projects, he had this to say, echoing the above sentiments:

The debate between privacy and security is a misleading one, as the kind and amount of data shared with private companies and the government need not and should not be the same. AI has been vilified in data privacy issues but the same technology (especially the upcoming metalearning approaches) can be used to ensure safety while preventing unwanted marketing and surveillance. If the monitoring tools (by design) were made incapable of reporting the data to authorities, unless there was a clear security threat, such situation would be like having nearly perfect privacy. It is technologically possible. Also, we need to merge privacy with profits, such that by and large, companies are not at odds with the regulatory authorities. This means there needs to be smarter media and social platforms, which present more choices for data sharing, choices that are acceptable between the end customer and the platforms.

Alfredo C. Tan, Industry Professor, DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University has extensive experience on B2C advertising platforms, and understands the need for fair exchange, baked in trust:

If there was better control and understanding of how personal data is being used, I believe people would be willing to be more open. The balance is ensuring there is a fair value exchange taking place. In exchange for my data, my experiences become better, if not in the present but in the future. And as long as this is a trusted relationship, and people understand the value exchange then people are open to sharing more and more information. I am happy that Facebook, Amazon, and other platforms are aware that I am a male between 35–45 with specific interests in travel and pets, but no interest in hockey or skateboarding. Or that based on certain movies I watch, Netflix makes recommendation on what other types of content I would be interested in to keep me more entertained. And maybe that data is used elsewhere, with my permission to make experiences better on other platforms. The battle for data in an increasingly competitive consumer landscape is to increase engagement using personalized insight they have gleaned about their customers to ultimately create better experiences. I am certain many people do not want to go back to the anonymous web where all of us are treated largely the same and there was no differentiation in the experience.

Everyone agrees the regression to anonymity is not plausible nor tenable.

Privacy, Security, Trust and Sustainability

This is the future and it’s critical that business and government develop a stance and embrace a different way of thinking. As AI becomes more pervasive, the black box of algorithms will mandate business to develop systems and policies to be vigilant against the potential harms. Cavoukian understands it’s an uphill battle:

When I have these conversations with CEOs, at first they think I’m anti-business and all I want to do is shut them down. It’s the farthest thing from my mind. You have to have businesses operating in a way that will attract customers AND keep their business models operating. That’s the view I think you should take. It has to be a win/win for all parties.

Do you have a data map? I always start there. You need to map how the data flows throughout your organization and determine where you need additional consent. Follow the flow within your organization. This will identify any gaps that may need fixing.

TRUST: it takes years to build… and days to lose…

Perhaps this is the view that companies should take. Ann Cavoukian maintains that those who have implemented PbD say it builds enormous trust. When you have a trusted business relationship with your customers, they’re happy to give you additional consent down the road. They just don’t want the information flowing out to third parties unknown.

I tell companies if you do PbD, shout it from the rooftops. Lead with it. Tell your customers the lengths you’re going to to protect their privacy, and the respect you have for them. They will thank you in so many ways. You’ll gain their continued loyalty, and you’ll attract new opportunity.
I say to companies who see privacy as a negative, saying that it stifles creativity and innovation: ‘It’s the exact opposite: Privacy breeds innovation and prosperity, and it will give you a competitive advantage. It allows you to start with a base of trust, which steadily enhances the growth of your customers and their loyalty. Make it a win/win proposition!

Ann Cavoukian has recently launched Global Privacy and Security by Design: GPSbyDesign.org, an International Council on Global Privacy and Security. For more information on Ann Cavoukian, please go to Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence, at Ryerson University.

This article first appeared on Forbes: Part 1 and Part II.

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How can the value of the cloud evolve between now and 2030?

According to McKinsey research, large enterprises aim to have about 60% of their environment in the cloud by 2025.

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Cloud technology has become an integral part of the digital transformation of today’s businesses. And that has executives asking themselves important questions — namely, how large is the value at stake in my sector? How quickly will this value be captured? Who will capture it? What can I do to ensure my organization gets its share? 

The answers are multifaceted, and were sought by researchers at McKinsey through a recent analysis. They conducted a thorough review of several key resources, including the McKinsey D2020 IT spending structure benchmarking study, and independent third-party surveys of more than 1,000 organizations that have adopted cloud technologies. Researchers addressed over 700 use cases across 20 different sub industries, ultimately to inform their conclusions, which we’ll cover more below.

Organizations That Maximize Cloud Value Do So In a Combined Approach

The first prominent finding of McKinsey’s review is a prominent trend among organizations that maximize cloud value. According to analysts, those that make the most of the technology do so in a three-pronged system:

Rejuvenate – IT cost optimization, resilience improvement, and core operations digitization

Innovate – innovation-driven growth, accelerated product development, and hyper scalability

Pioneer – early adoption of cloud technology

The Potential Value Waiting To Be Unlocked In Cloud Technology

Another important finding of the review, McKinsey researchers suggest that the potential value in cloud technology is substantial. After analyzing the value at stake for adoption in US Fortune 500 companies, they estimated that up to $1 trillion in annual value is waiting to be unlocked by 2030. Moreover, when applying those same drivers to Forbes Global 2000 companies, the potential value is estimated to be around $3 trillion in EBITDA (Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) over the next decade.

Asia’s Potential for EBITDA Gains

The report noted that Asia is in line to reap the highest cloud value potential from adoption at about $1.3 trillion by 2030. The continent’s businesses make up the largest regional revenue share of the Forbes Global 2000 companies analyzed, many of which fall within the oil, gas and banking industries. These are sectors which McKinsey researchers have identified as having particularly high potential for value gains from cloud adoption.

The Americas aren’t far behind, coming in second with a potential cloud value of around $1.2 trillion, driven largely by retail and manufacturing sub industries. These specific domestic sectors stand to capture nearly $162 Billion in EBITDA growth by 2030 – more than three times the value potential for those in Asia and the European Union.

The Keys to Unlocking Value

McKinsey interviewed more than 50 CTOs, CIOs, and cloud program leaders from prominent North American enterprises to better understand their work and what success factors they had in common. The research concluded that the most successful cloud adopters leveraged three key levers:

1. Discovering the full value of the cloud.
2. Solving critical technical challenges.
3. Delivering fundamental, organizational change.

These organizations withstood the challenges of cloud adoption and emerged better-positioned to capture value. Their key takeaway was that creating an effective cloud program requires a combination of technical and organizational capabilities, as well as the right mindset. This means that even if an organization has the necessary tools, they may still need to make changes in areas such as strategy, culture, and processes in order to fully benefit from cloud technology.

Read the full report from McKinsey

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WeaveSphere: 5 conference highlights

The WeaveSphere tech conference wove together ideas about AI, FinTech, STEM education, innovation in Canada, and more.

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For three days this November, innovation, collaboration, and a whole lot of big ideas were shared among “Weavers” during the WeaveSphere tech conference in Toronto.

“Today is an opportunity for greater connection between the scientific and tech industry, and academia,” said Marcellus Mindel of IBM Canada, opening the conference. With innovation the event’s core, Mindel added: “let’s define innovation, thinking of it as reframing that implements better outcomes.”

While lots happened over three days, here are five highlights and takeaways from the event:

1. Thought-provoking keynotes had attendees thinking big

Each day of WeaveSphere kicked off with a keynote, where three speakers brought their insightful ideas to attendees.

Gillian Hadfield shared ideas about AI and regulation

On Day 1, Gillian Hadfield, Professor of Law and director of the Schwartz Reisman Institute for Technology and Society at the University of Toronto, explained where we are today when it comes to regulating artificial intelligence (AI) — and where we need to go next. 

While AI makes machines intelligent, Hadfield argued that it cannot, by definition, produce intelligent behaviour if it isn’t functioning appropriately and ethically. Machine learning is not the same as standard programming, since machines write the rules. As a result, machines can start solving problems in ways we don’t want them to, resulting in regulatory challenges. 

How to solve this? Hadfield presented two solutions:

  1. Establish compensation for harm
  2. Design incentives for meeting good and safe behaviour

Dr. William Barry discussed ethics with an AI co-presenter

On Day 2, professor, AI ethicist, and futurist Dr. William Barry talked about a particular problem: what ethical questions might arise when you program a robot? 

For starters, how do you determine what information to include or not? Where is the appropriate line? 

As a professor, Dr. Barry has been working with robots as teaching assistants in his classroom since 2015, and brought a digital version of Maria Bot (one of his AI assistants) to interact with the audience.

As Dr. Barry explained, he is very strategic when choosing the information from which his assistants learn. 

One place Maria won’t get access to? Twitter, says Dr. Barry, highlighting it’s too much of a risk for an “AI benign” to get access to misinformation. This would distort the ethical perspective that Maria is learning, he said. 

While he has programmed her to weed out and to not learn from toxic content — like racism and misogyny — Dr. Barry does work at exposing his AI beings to a wide range of diverse thought and lived experiences. In the end, how ethical an AI being is, is in the hands of the human controlling what they learn, he argued. As a result, they’ll ultimately be biased as a result of the specific data sets we provide for them. 

Marcel Mitran discussed technology for good

WeaveSphere’s Day 3 keynote took a slight turn away from AI. 

IBM Fellow, IBM Master Inventor, and CTO for Cloud Platform for zSystems and LinuxONE, Marcel Mitran took to the main stage for a keynote on responsible computing. At the heart of his talk was the argument that technologists need to take a step back and look at what’s being done to keep the world safe. 

For example, the opportunity for error and bias in the role of facial recognition in public safety, and the fact that our digital footprints — both on a personal level and for enterprise — have grown significantly even in the last year.

As Mitran explained, responsible computing is a systemic, holistic approach addressing current and future computing challenges like sustainability, ethics, and professionalism. It advances the “quadruple bottom line” of people, planet, prosperity, and participation. 

2. Insightful sessions had attendees thinking deep

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere

FinTech, cryptocurrency, AI, digital economies, Canada’s innovation landscape — there was a large cross-section of topics covered across a variety of workshops, paper presentation, and panel discussions. 

Some highlights include:

Chhavi Singh, co-founder of Flyte, asked the question: have you considered using AI to coach your sales staff? Elaborating on the opportunity AI presents to increase sales performance, Singh explained how AI can be used to help understand customer challenges and handle objections and concerns. 

COO of wealth management platform OneVest, Jakob Pizzera, outlined the three phases of FinTech. The first (1.0) was in-house sites for basic online banking. Version 2.0 was the “unbundling” of financial services, and the rise of standalone businesses. The last few years has brought FinTech 3.0, with embedded finance — for example making a purchase through Instagram.

WeaveSphere conference chair and R&D specialist Vio Onut answered the question of why we need to care about cyber security. For starters, the potentially very large costs to your organization, and because the massive skills gap of privacy and security experts has created vulnerabilities. 

Digital strategist Matt Everson explored what can go with emerging technologies like Web3 and the metaverse. Everson said developers should just start building and drawing on video game virtual markets as a model. He used popular online game EVE Online as an example of how virtual economy design can be translated to other markets.

Lijia Hou, Blockchain Systems Engineer with Draft Kings, explained that three key problems still exist when it comes to blockchain technology. First, investors want to understand how — in a volatile market — to mitigate risk. Second, developers from the traditional software side need a mindset shift when it comes to decentralization. And finally, the tools of decentralization are used differently, and this is not always evident for those unfamiliar with Web3.

3. There was a LOT of interest in STEM education

As part of WeaveSphere’s Education Day slate of programming, hundreds of high school and university students had the opportunity to workshop real-life problems from both school and work — all under the guidance of IBM’s Design Thinking experts

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere

This meeting of next-generation tech talent collaboratively explored Enterprise Design Thinking strategies like As-Is Scenario Mapping, Empathy Mapping, Hills (positioning statements), and Hopes and Fears. This approach to problem-solving works by framing the issue at hand in a human-centric way, centering the end-user in all decision-making. 

For Education Day, the problem at hand was helping fourth-year university students find their first job. 

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere

4. There were loads of networking and learning opportunities

One of the best parts of any conference is the opportunity to network and learn from fellow attendees.

In the conference’s Innovation Valley section, event sponsors were on-hand to discuss everything from their latest technologies to job opportunities, plus several graduate students were also there to present their research.

Since WeaveSphere is a “meeting of the minds” between tech professionals and students, many undergrads from schools like York University and Mohawk College came to the conference full of questions, ready to absorb everything. 

5. WeaveSphere celebrated top tech talent

A big part of WeaveSphere was a celebration of some of the best tech minds in Canada. 

During a gala evening at the end of Day 2, the 2022 Developer 30 Under 30 and Tech Titans were awarded to the best of the best among young developers and digital transformation leaders in Canada. 

The winners were:

Developer 30 Under 30 winners

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere
  • Alexander Newman
  • Anakha Chellakudam
  • Anthony Langford
  • Arshdeep Saini
  • Aryaman Rastogi
  • Bohdan Senyshyn
  • Charlie Mackie
  • Charmi Chokshi
  • Colin Lee
  • Daniel Marantz
  • Francisco Hodge 
  • Hassan Djirdeh
  • Jerry Fengwei Zhang
  • Julia Paglia
  • Karandeep Bhardwaj
  • Kathryn Kodama
  • Khushbu Patel
  • Lianne Lardizabal
  • Lucas Giancola
  • Mathew Mozaffari
  • Maz Mandi
  • Oleksandr Kostrikov
  • Rishab Kumar
  • Samantha Lauer
  • Sarah Syed
  • Stan Petley
  • Tanmay Bakshi
  • Tim Romanski
  • Xiaole Zeng
  • Yash Kapadia

Tech Titans winners

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere
  • Andrew Dolinski
  • Ashish Agrawal
  • Chhavi Singh
  • Chris Dolinski
  • Dean Skurka
  • Demetrius Tsafaridis
  • Fay Arjomandi
  • Harish Pandian
  • Harpreet Gill
  • Iman Bashir
  • James Stewart
  • Len Covello
  • Manav Gupta
  • Marcel Mitran
  • Michelle Joliat
  • Dr. Mohamad Sawwaf
  • Omar A. Butt
  • Peter Zwicker
  • Ryan McDonald
  • Dr. William Cherniak

Finally, as WeaveSphere came to a close, the Pitch Stadium opened, hearing from a wide variety of startups. 

They came, they pitched, and in the end, Iman Bashir and Nicole Lytle of Craftly.AI, a copywriting assistant that uses AI to generate original content, took home the $50,000 prize to help grow their business.

Photo courtesy WeaveSphere

WeaveSphere was a uniquely collaborative, innovation-focused conference filled with engaging workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities.


DX Journal is an official media partner for WeaveSphere. Check out our series of articles from the lead-up to WeaveSphere.

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7 Digital Transformation trends on the horizon for 2023

Salesforce’s MuleSoft reports seven trends that are key to balancing operational pressure and improved customer and employee experience.

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Efficiency and growth are at the heart of many a business plans right now, even though an economic downturn is widely predicted to be on the horizon.

In the face of these organizational pressures, Salesforce’s MuleSoft recently released a report detailing their predictions and insights for digital transformation in 2023. In the report, they outlined seven trends that are going to be crucial for organizations that want to overcome these pressures while keeping the gas on customer and employee experiences. 

As MuleSoft Global Field CTO Matt McLarty explained, “as companies gear up for the year ahead, businesses must recognize that effectively utilizing new digital techniques is the only way to ensure growth amidst economic pressures.” 

“Investing in cost efficient, employee- and customer-centric technologies will be critical for companies seeking to remain agile and break away from the competition in 2023.” 

Here are MuleSoft’s seven digital transformation trends-to-watch:

Increase in automation investment

MuleSoft’s research has validated what many in the industry have already predicted regarding the projected growth of automation tools. According to a previous survey, roughly 80% of organizations plan on incorporating hyperautomation into their technology roadmap within the next 24 months. This points to a paradigm shift in the way businesses operate, as they move away from reliance on manual processes to a more digitized and technology-enabled future.

Composability is key

MuleSoft and Salesforce predict that in lieu of the point mentioned above, companies will be inclined to implement strategies like low/no-code platforms and application programming interfaces (APIs) to make their automation efforts more composable.

The rise of low/no-code tools

The report from September found that 73% of leaders agree that acquiring IT talent is the hardest it’s ever been, which makes perfect sense given the global shortage of software developers. In order to free up resources and enable a wider range of employees to participate in digital transformation, low/no-code platforms will continue to grow in popularity.

Investment In total experience (TX) strategies

Amid findings that 86% of IT leaders believe that both employee and customer experience (EX and CX) are as important as a company’s products, MuleSoft’s research anticipates that organizations will increase their focus on delivering great experiences through loyalty and advocacy.

CX and EX initiatives will work in tandem to increase revenue and retain talent, focusing on integration and automation that connect the dots where these two meet.

Data-Driven Decision Making Should Be Technology’s Job

Salesforce research highlights that 83% of organizations consider data-driven decisions to be a top priority in their organization. This data, however, is often siloed. As a result, MuleSoft predicts, 2023 will see the rise of real-time analytics to bread down silos, to “create a data fabric that provides automated, intelligent, and real-time insights and reduces untimely decisions.”

Cybersecurity Is Set to Scale

Expect to see more organizations invest in a cybersecurity mesh approach in order to secure data as it moves between multiple cloud applications. This is in response to data from Gartner that claims doing so could reduce the financial impact of security incidents by 90%.

Sustainability Will Be a Priority

Organizations are likely to increase their adoption of data-driven insights and integration across supply chains as they seek to become more sustainable. 


Download the full Mulesoft report

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