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Microsoft makes significant DX investment in Greece

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Microsoft has made a substantial digital transformation investment in Greece, creating an initiative called “GR for GRowth.”

The initiative — announced on October 5 — is a technology commitment that will help create new opportunities for growth in the country. One part of the overall initiative will be the construction of new datacenters that will establish a Microsoft Cloud region in the country. 

These datacenters bring Microsoft’s total global footprint of cloud regions to 63.

As a support measure, Microsoft is also planning to skill approximately 100,000 people in the country in digital technologies by 2025.

At the announcement, Prime Minister of Greece Kyriakos Mitsotakis said:

“Today’s commitment to the people and businesses of Greece will position the country among the digital leaders of Europe. A Microsoft datacenter region provides a competitive advantage to our digital economy. At the same time, it is a long-term investment and a vote of confidence in our country’s potential. The cloud is transforming every industry and sector. The investment in skilling 100,000 citizens will empower today and tomorrow’s Greek workforce.”

Brad Smith, president of Microsoft added:

“By a substantial margin, this is the largest investment Microsoft has made in Greece in the 28 years we have been operating here. In part, this reflects confidence that our world-leading datacenter technology can help enable innovation and growth across Greece’s economy. In addition, this large investment reflects our optimism about Greece’s future, its forward-leaning government, and the country’s ongoing economic recovery.”

The impact on Greece

For companies, startups, and institutions in Greece, this announcement means they’ll be able to harness the power of cloud computing — keeping in mind cybersecurity, data residency, and compliance standards, as explained in the company’s press release.

While many companies in Greece are using Microsoft’s cloud, a number of others have committed to signing on once they’ll be available from the forthcoming region.

As previously noted, to support the digital transformation of public and private organizations, Microsoft aims to upskill an estimated 100,000 public sector, business and IT professionals, educators, and students.

This aspect of the overall initiative will take place over the next five years via online and physical courses and workshops.

A cultural celebration 

One interesting role Microsoft’s cloud services will play is in highlighting and preserving Greece’s culture.

The company’s AI for Cultural Heritage program will collaborate with the Ministry of Culture and Sports to bring to life the Ancient City of Olympia. Available in 2021, visitors will be able to experience the UNESCO World Heritage Site as if they were there 3,000 years ago.  

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Bang for the buck: How USD exchange rates have changed for 10 major travel destinations

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If you're itching to get back to international travel, consider how the U.S. dollar compares with local currencies, thanks to data from TravelPerk.
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Ready to see the world? If you’re one of the thousands bitten by the travel bug, you know that the industry has picked up in a big way since many countries have lifted COVID-19 restrictions. TSA checkpoint data showed that the number of travelers in U.S. airports throughout 2022 was more than 30% higher than in 2021.

International travel has come back with a bang after borders have reopened and quarantine restrictions have lessened. But before you pack your bags and get your passport stamped, you should know all the basics of the country you are visiting—including the language, currency, and the exchange rate of the U.S. dollar.

TravelPerk compared how the U.S. dollar has strengthened or weakened against the local currencies of 10 top travel destinations using data from Google Finance. Exchange rates were compared between Dec. 28, 2021, and Dec. 28, 2022. Locations for this list were chosen after analyzing U.S. National Travel and Tourism Office data on the most popular countries visited by American travelers.

Luckily for budget-minded travelers, the U.S. dollar has strengthened against the currency of many popular travel destinations on this list. However, the dollar has weakened compared to several warm-weather destinations in neighboring Central America and the Caribbean.

By arming yourself with information about the exchange rate, you can better budget for the food, drink, and entertainment you’ll no doubt buy in your destination. In some countries, your savings might stretch further than you’d expect, while others might require that you budget for more than you initially expected.

Two people exchanging dollars for euros.

Ton Anurak // Shutterstock

Eurozone

– USD value, December 2021: 0.88 euros
– USD value, December 2022: 0.94
– Year-over-year change: 6.8%

Twenty countries in the eurozone accept the euro, making it a particularly versatile currency for travelers. Whether you want to eat waffles in Belgium, sip champagne at the top of the Eiffel Tower in France, or tour cathedrals in Italy, having plenty of euros in your pocket is crucial to a European vacation.

The value of the euro compared to the U.S. dollar has seen some volatility over the last 10 years, but this has largely worked in Americans’ favor. Where you used to need about $1.50 to equal 1 euro, the rate between the two currencies is now much closer to a 1-1 ratio.

Dollars and Mexican Pesos assorted bills cash pile.

AGCuesta // Shutterstock

Mexico

– USD value, December 2021: 20.66 Mexican pesos
– USD value, December 2022: 19.44
– Year-over-year change: -5.9%

When you think of traveling to Mexico, your first thought might be of all-inclusive resorts on pristine beaches. But the country has so much more to offer to travelers. History buffs can marvel at the pyramids of Chichén Itzá; foodies can try different street tacos from vendors in Mexico City; and beach enthusiasts can soak up the sun on some of the most beautiful beaches in the world.

Mexico is a pretty affordable trip for U.S. visitors, thanks to its proximity and the value of the Mexican peso against the dollar. While you might get fewer pesos for your dollar than last year, you can still expect your money to stretch a long way.

Young man smiling counting Canadian dollars in a city.

Krakenimages.com // Shutterstock

Canada

– USD value, December 2021: 1.28 Canadian dollars
– USD value, December 2022: 1.36
– Year-over-year change: 6.3%

The Great White North also uses a dollar for its currency, the value of which has changed in U.S. travelers’ favor recently. This will come as welcome news to outdoor enthusiasts ready to soak up the stunning Canadian landscapes.

More than cold weather and donuts, this massive country is home to stunning mountains and waterfalls, ski resorts, museums, and more. Walk the 400-year-old cobbled streets of Old Québec, go on a culinary tour in foodie cities like Toronto and Vancouver, or check out the other side of the famous Niagara Falls.

Pound coin sitting on a dollar bill.

pitchr // Shutterstock

United Kingdom

– USD value, December 2021: 0.74 British pounds
– USD value, December 2022: 0.83
– Year-over-year change: 12.2%

When the United Kingdom left the European Union, the value of the British pound fell significantly. While not without ramifications to the international finance world, the upside is that U.S. travelers can stretch their dollars further than before.

The U.K. has no shortage of tourist attractions to entice travelers, such as museums packed with global history in London and castles in the countryside. England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland each offer unique histories and landscapes.

Cashier counting Dominican Republic 500 peso bank notes.

Cloudy Design // Shutterstock

Dominican Republic

– USD value, December 2021: 57.05 Dominican pesos
– USD value, December 2022: 56.05
– Year-over-year change: -1.8%

If you’re looking for a trip that will get you a lot of bang for your buck, look no further than the Dominican Republic. One American dollar can get you quite a few Dominican pesos, despite the exchange rate falling slightly in the last year.

This island nation is an ideal destination for adventure seekers and beach bums alike. Those who prefer a little adrenaline can go rafting or paragliding in Jarabacoa, while those who want to lay out on the beach next to crystal blue water can check out resorts in Punta Cana. The Dominican Republic is just a short flight away from the U.S. and boasts cheap eats and a favorable exchange rate.

Woman buying a drink at a corner shop in Jamaica.

byvalet // Shutterstock

Jamaica

– USD value, December 2021: 153.52 Jamaican dollars
– USD value, December 2022: 153.07
– Year-over-year change: -0.3%

Jamaica is another great island destination for travelers trying to stretch their dollars as far as possible. While the American dollar has weakened in many warm-weather destinations in the last year, it has remained fairly stable when compared to the Jamaican dollar.

Like other Caribbean islands, Jamaica is a veritable paradise for travelers seeking lush rainforests, stunning beaches, or mountain hiking. You can zipline through the forest, climb the Blue Mountains, or sip a fruity beverage on the beach at an all-inclusive resort. Don’t forget, the food in Jamaica is also renowned, whether you prefer curry or fresh seafood.

Person handing Chinese yuan across a counter.

Ton Anurak // Shutterstock

China

– USD value, December 2021: 6.37 Chinese yuan
– USD value, December 2022: 6.98
– Year-over-year change: 9.6%

China can be challenging for Americans to get to, requiring a special visa for entry and several connecting flights. Still, it is a bucket list destination for many for a reason. The country’s rich culture, delicious food, stunning vistas, and fascinating history make it an excellent destination for travelers.

From the Great Wall to the Forbidden City in Beijing or the Terracotta Army in Xian, there is no shortage of famous attractions to soak in as you travel across this large country. Plus, your dollar can get you quite a few Chinese yuan, and the exchange rate has strengthened in the last year.

Closeup of customer paying with Japan yen banknote for food in the market.

Atiwat Witthayanurut // Shutterstock

Japan

– USD value, December 2021: 114.77 Japanese yen
– USD value, December 2022: 134.39
– Year-over-year change: 17.1%

Compared to the Japanese yen, the U.S. dollar has steadily strengthened over the last few years, meaning now is a better time than ever to visit this island nation.

Take the bullet train to Tokyo to see the tower, museums, temples, and a bustling urban scene. WWII buffs can check out the memorials in Hiroshima, while foodies can fill up on sushi, ramen, and curry. Japan also boasts some of the most acclaimed theme parks in the world, some of the most beautiful beaches, and rich culture—there is something for everyone on a trip to this country.

Hand takes out India Banknotes from wallet.

Andrzej Rostek // Shutterstock

India

– USD value, December 2021: 74.71 Indian rupees
– USD value, December 2022: 82.85
– Year-over-year change: 10.9%

Like China, India requires U.S. travelers to apply for a special visa to enter the country. But it is worth it for many travelers, as the diverse country has a ton to offer in terms of tourism. Not only can you get plenty of Indian rupees for your dollar, but you can use them for some of the best food in the world, or to visit famous attractions like the Taj Mahal in Agra.

Urban travelers will love the bustling streets of Mumbai, while those who prefer the countryside can check out the many beautiful temples and shrines.

Costa Rica cash withdrawn from an ATM.

Andrzej Rostek // Shutterstock

Costa Rica

– USD value, December 2021: 649.96 Costa Rican colóns
– USD value, December 2022: 581.19
– Year-over-year change: -10.6%

Like the other warm-weather destinations on our list, the U.S. dollar has weakened compared to Costa Rican colóns. And still, your dollars will take you a long way in this affordable travel destination.

The landscape of Costa Rica is known as some of the most beautiful in the world, featuring lush rainforests, volcanos, beaches, and diverse wildlife. It is an ideal destination for divers, hikers, and other adventure seekers. Animal lovers can visit the country’s many rescue centers to meet the local wildlife, from jaguars and monkeys on land to turtles and rays under the sea.

This story originally appeared on TravelPerk and was produced and
distributed in partnership with Stacker Studio.

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Highest-paying jobs that don’t require a degree

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College isn't for everyone, so Stacker used Bureau of Labor Statistics data to find the 50 highest-paying jobs that don't require a college degree.
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College isn’t for everyone, but many people—especially in recent generations—feel pressured to get a degree to achieve success. One recent survey found that at least 4 in 5 high school students (86%) felt this pressure from friends and family, with nearly 3 in 4 (73%) saying their post-high school decisions are determined by a career path.

It is true that lifetime earnings for those with a bachelor’s degree are typically higher than for those with just a high school diploma. But people who don’t graduate college can make a good living. A little over half of workers nationwide don’t have a college degree, and there are many high-paying jobs for them to choose from.

Stacker used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to find the 50 highest-paying jobs out of nearly 500 that don’t require a college degree. Jobs are ranked by annual wages; those without annual wages available were not considered. Other experience and training requirements, as well as employment levels and projections, were also included in the analysis but don’t affect the rankings.

College enrollment has dropped off in the last few years after a historic high, partially thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are among those who aren’t sure if college is the best fit for you, whether due to the cost or other factors, you can rest easy knowing there are plenty of career paths available.

Whether you want a technical and mechanical career in repairs or to supervise a retail shop, there are many options for noncollege graduates. Just keep in mind that some of the careers listed here require other forms of education or licensure, including specialized training programs or apprenticeships.

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Canva

#50. Electrical and electronics repairers, commercial and industrial equipment

– Median annual wage, 2021: $61,730
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 69.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 52,800
— Expected change by 2031: 1,200 jobs added

Oleg Golovnev // Shutterstock

#49. First-line supervisors of production and operating workers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $61,790
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 74.1% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 646,800
— Expected change by 2031: 12,200 jobs added

rawpixel.com // Shutterstock

#48. Real estate brokers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,010
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 39.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 123,100
— Expected change by 2031: 7,100 jobs added

Syda Productions // Shutterstock

#47. Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,060
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 44.6% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 508,000
— Expected change by 2031: 102,600 jobs lost

Rebekah Zemansky // Shutterstock

#46. First-line supervisors of correctional officers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,220
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 57.7% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 55,900
— Expected change by 2031: 3,300 jobs lost

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Canva

#45. Crane and tower operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,240
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 89.1% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 45,100
— Expected change by 2031: 200 jobs added

Monkey Business Images // Shutterstock

#44. Insurance appraisers, auto damage

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,680
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 38.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 13,200
— Expected change by 2031: 700 jobs lost

Oil and Gas Photographer // Shutterstock

#43. Control and valve installers and repairers, except mechanical door

– Median annual wage, 2021: $62,760
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 45,700
— Expected change by 2031: 300 jobs added

socrates471 // Shutterstock

#42. Media and communication equipment workers, all other

– Median annual wage, 2021: $63,250
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 40.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Short-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 20,700
— Expected change by 2031: 1,000 jobs added

kittirat roekburi // Shutterstock

#41. Stationary engineers and boiler operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $63,500
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 67.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 32,500
— Expected change by 2031: 1,300 jobs added

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ded pixto // Shutterstock

#40. Wellhead pumpers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $63,740
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 80.1% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 18,000
— Expected change by 2031: 600 jobs added

Canva

#39. Railroad brake, signal, and switch operators and locomotive firers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $63,840
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 73.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 11,800
— Expected change by 2031: 100 jobs added

Canva

#38. Railroad conductors and yardmasters

– Median annual wage, 2021: $63,960
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 34,300
— Expected change by 2031: 1,600 jobs added

Canva

#37. Boilermakers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $64,290
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 92.3% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Apprenticeship
– Number of jobs in 2021: 13,900
— Expected change by 2031: 600 jobs lost

Canva

#36. Fire inspectors and investigators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $64,600
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 54.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: 5 years or more
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 15,500
— Expected change by 2031: 500 jobs added

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pio3 // Shutterstock

#35. Police and sheriff’s patrol officers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $64,610
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 43.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 684,900
— Expected change by 2031: 21,500 jobs added

JL IMAGES // Shutterstock

#34. Transit and railroad police

– Median annual wage, 2021: $64,930
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 43.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 3,500
— Expected change by 2031: 100 jobs added

Monkey Business Images // Shutterstock

#33. Claims adjusters, examiners, and investigators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $65,080
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 38.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 314,300
— Expected change by 2031: 18,300 jobs lost

santi lumubol // Shutterstock

#32. Aircraft mechanics and service technicians

– Median annual wage, 2021: $65,380
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 66.1% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 131,700
— Expected change by 2031: 8,000 jobs added

Canva

#31. Chemical plant and system operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $70,200
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 22,400
— Expected change by 2031: 200 jobs lost

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Canva

#30. Gas compressor and gas pumping station operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $70,720
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 80.1% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 3,000
— Expected change by 2031: No change

4 PM production // Shutterstock

#29. First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $71,260
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 72.3% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 544,700
— Expected change by 2031: 19,800 jobs added

sculpies // Shutterstock

#28. First-line supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $72,010
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 81.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: 5 years or more
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 735,500
— Expected change by 2031: 29,900 jobs added

Syda Productions // Shutterstock

#27. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $73,060
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 62.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: 5 years or more
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 847,600
— Expected change by 2031: 23,600 jobs lost

Canva

#26. Pile driver operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $76,260
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 91.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 3,900
— Expected change by 2031: 200 jobs added

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HannaTor // Shutterstock

#25. Gambling managers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $76,910
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 47.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 4,100
— Expected change by 2031: 500 jobs added

Canva

#24. Electrical and electronics installers and repairers, transportation equipment

– Median annual wage, 2021: $77,250
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 69.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 9,200
— Expected change by 2031: 300 jobs added

Canva

#23. Athletes and sports competitors

– Median annual wage, 2021: $77,300
– Typical education needed: No formal educational credential
— 36.6% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 15,800
— Expected change by 2031: 5,700 jobs added

Christian Lagerek // Shutterstock

#22. Gas plant operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $77,850
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 15,300
— Expected change by 2031: 1,400 jobs lost

Canva

#21. First-line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $78,230
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 44.3% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 82,800
— Expected change by 2031: 3,400 jobs added

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Luisa Leal Photography // Shutterstock

#20. Electrical power-line installers and repairers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $78,310
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 126,600
— Expected change by 2031: 4,000 jobs added

Oil and Gas Photographer // Shutterstock

#19. Petroleum pump system operators, refinery operators, and gaugers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $79,540
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 76.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 35,300
— Expected change by 2031: 1,000 jobs added

g-stockstudio // Shutterstock

#18. First-line supervisors of nonretail sales workers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $79,680
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 48.6% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 406,900
— Expected change by 2031: 1,400 jobs lost

APChanel // Shutterstock

#17. Locomotive engineers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $79,740
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 75.7% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 26,600
— Expected change by 2031: 1,300 jobs added

Canva

#16. Transportation inspectors

– Median annual wage, 2021: $79,770
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 64.3% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 24,900
— Expected change by 2031: 500 jobs added

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Ken Wolter // Shutterstock

#15. Postmasters and mail superintendents

– Median annual wage, 2021: $80,250
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 36.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 12,300
— Expected change by 2031: 600 jobs lost

APChanel // Shutterstock

#14. Signal and track switch repairers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $80,570
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 79.3% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 6,800
— Expected change by 2031: 200 jobs added

michaeljung // Shutterstock

#13. Power plant operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $80,850
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 62.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 29,200
— Expected change by 2031: 4,500 jobs lost

wonderlustpicstravel // Shutterstock

#12. Subway and streetcar operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $81,180
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 73.8% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 10,600
— Expected change by 2031: 400 jobs added

Igor Kardasov // Shutterstock

#11. Captains, mates, and pilots of water vessels

– Median annual wage, 2021: $81,640
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 71.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 36,800
— Expected change by 2031: 400 jobs added

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#10. Ship engineers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $82,410
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 75.6% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 7,900
— Expected change by 2031: 100 jobs lost

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#9. Detectives and criminal investigators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $83,640
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 29.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 112,900
— Expected change by 2031: 800 jobs lost

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#8. Electrical and electronics repairers, powerhouse, substation, and relay

– Median annual wage, 2021: $93,420
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 69.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 22,800
— Expected change by 2031: 1,100 jobs lost

Canva

#7. Elevator and escalator installers and repairers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $97,860
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 77.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Apprenticeship
– Number of jobs in 2021: 23,200
— Expected change by 2031: 700 jobs added

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#6. Transportation, storage, and distribution managers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $98,230
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 60.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: 5 years or more
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 150,700
— Expected change by 2031: 12,700 jobs added

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#5. Power distributors and dispatchers

– Median annual wage, 2021: $98,530
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 62.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 9,700
— Expected change by 2031: 600 jobs lost

Canva

#4. First-line supervisors of police and detectives

– Median annual wage, 2021: $99,330
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 37.4% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: Less than 5 years
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 132,300
— Expected change by 2031: 3,700 jobs added

Skycolors // Shutterstock

#3. Commercial pilots

– Median annual wage, 2021: $99,640
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 18.2% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Moderate-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 47,700
— Expected change by 2031: 2,400 jobs added

Gorodenkoff // Shutterstock

#2. Nuclear power reactor operators

– Median annual wage, 2021: $104,260
– Typical education needed: High school diploma or equivalent
— 62.5% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: Long-term
– Number of jobs in 2021: 4,800
— Expected change by 2031: 1,300 jobs lost

Kokulina // Shutterstock

#1. Makeup artists, theatrical and performance

– Median annual wage, 2021: $134,750
– Typical education needed: Postsecondary nondegree award
— 67.9% of workers in this job don’t have a degree
— Typical related experience required: None
— Typical on-the-job training required: None
– Number of jobs in 2021: 4,400
— Expected change by 2031: 300 jobs added

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How shopping stacks up in 10 major US cities

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What's shopping culture like near you and far away? CouponBirds analyzed Census Bureau data and other material about shopping in 10 U.S. cities.  
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In-store shopping across the U.S. is making a comeback after the COVID-19 pandemic thwarted many opportunities for shoppers. In May 2022, in-store sales grew 13.4% from May 2021 levels, according to CNN. With the pressures of inflation, consumers want more social interaction and fewer delivery charges.

But where are the best places to go shopping in person?

Cities such as Los Angeles, New York City, or Chicago offer shoppers the usual staples such as shopping malls, farmers markets, and unique boutiques that sell local designers’ clothes or great gift ideas. Other cities are expanding their offerings, such as Boston and Houston, where new stores are opening or have already opened their doors for business.

Other shopping destinations target tourists and levy a steep sales tax. For example, New Orleans and Seattle levy over 9% sales tax for goods. “Overall, the average combined state and local sales tax is 6.57%,” according to an AARP report comparing U.S. states’ sales taxes. However, Philadelphia, arguably a tourist city for its historical landmarks, does not levy a sales tax on clothes or shoes.

CouponBirds used data from the Census Bureau, city and state governments, news coverage, and other resources to compare shopping cultures and trends across 10 major U.S. cities.

Shoppers walking down a busy New York street.

ANGELA WEISS/AFP // Getty Images

New York

Retail shopping in New York City—in areas such as SoHo, Union Square, Greenwich Village, or Times Square—is a very important economic source for the city. With a 2021 population of 8.47 million residents, the taxable retail sales jumped from $48.8 billion in 2021 to $62.3 billion in 2022. For most retail sales, the total tax rate is 8.875%, including local and state levies.

New, experimental ways of selling goods are getting a trial run in New York City. “In 2023, the trend for concept stores is the digital transformation of brick-and-mortar stores,” according to Behavior Analytics Retail. For example, Nike offers a shopping app that helps people choose and find the best shoes or a gift for someone else. Shoppers can also scan their feet, upload the data to the app, and have custom shoes shipped to their homes.

Retailers from other cities are also expanding to New York, with LA landmark Cult Gaia arriving in SoHo. Other stores offer customers services beyond just selling items. For instance, Nordstrom offers a high-end restaurant as well as bars—one called Shoe Bar, tucked away in its basement full of shoes. And American Girl has an interactive and innovative location at Rockefeller Plaza, with hair styling, ear piercing, and manicures.

People and rides at the entertainment center at the Mall of America.

Erwin Widmer // Shutterstock

Minneapolis

With 40 million visitors to the Mall of America each year, the Minneapolis outlet offers 500 retail stores and hundreds of events for locals and tourists alike. There’s even a theme park with roller coaster rides. The mall recycles more than 60% of its waste, doesn’t have central heating, uses over 30,000 live plants as air purifiers, and offers electric vehicle charging stations.

Shopping in Minneapolis may also take visitors to local thrift shops or farmers markets. Women may find trendy indie wear or jewelry, and men may find sophisticated clothes, shoes, or T-shirts. Most farmers markets are seasonal and only open on the weekends, although one is open during the week.

The city, which has 425,336 residents as of 2021, saw $5.3 billion in taxable retail sales in 2020. The local sales tax rate—including state, county, and city taxes—is 7.525%.

People wearing masks shopping for plants and flowers at an outdoor market.

Liu Guanguan/China News Service //Getty Images

San Francisco

San Francisco offers a wide variety of shopping choices throughout the city. Local Take, for example, sells unique handmade gifts and San Francisco-inspired items. There’s also San Francisco Mercantile, which sells over 100 different items from local makers and designers.

Fillmore Street, Japantown, Mission District, and Haight Street are great shopping districts with their own local flair. The Westfield San Francisco Centre, Union Square, Pier 39, and Hayes Valley also offer a range of name-brand and boutique stores. For food shopping, Heart of the City Farmers Market is a farmer-run nonprofit outfit with plenty of fresh and organic options.

The city of 815,000 had $11.1 billion in taxable retail sales in 2021. The total sales tax rate in San Francisco is 8.625%.

Local artisans selling at a market.

Andriy Blokhin // Shutterstock

New Orleans

New Orleans is a tourist city, especially when Mardi Gras season and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival come around. Carnival season and Mardi Gras offer tourists a glimpse into the spirit of New Orleans but also shopping extravaganzas for the parades. At Jazz Fest, local and nationally known craft vendors showcase art, clothing, festival posters and more.

There are many shopping options during the year, too, such as the French Market, Magazine Street, or the Riverwalk outlets. The French Market is one of the oldest markets in New Orleans and offers a wide range of souvenirs, gifts, local products, and artwork. Don’t forget to stop by Cafe Du Monde for some beignets, cafe au lait, or a hot chocolate. Magazine Street sells international clothing, local art, and pottery. The Riverwalk outlet is a mall that sells items from national and international brands, such as Kate Spade, for a more commercial feel.

In this city of 377,000 people, the sales tax rate is 9.45%, including state and county taxes. In the French Quarter, there is an additional surcharge to pay for additional police patrols, for a total tax rate of 9.695%.

A person carrying several shopping bags with Christmas decorations in the background.

Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe // Getty Images

Boston

Boston, a city of 655,000, offers sophisticated style for shoppers, especially on Newbury Street. There are outlets and other retail centers at Copley Place, 100 Huntington Avenue, or Downtown Crossing. Tourist attractions and even more shopping are at Prudential Center or Faneuil Hall Marketplace. For fresh produce, try the open-air Haymarket.

The state’s sales tax rate is 6.25%, and there is no additional local or county sales tax.

Bundled up shoppers walking downtown in Chicago.

Joel Lerner/Xinhua // Getty Images

Chicago

Chicago shopping offers visitors and locals a luxurious treat at the Oak Street District, where shoppers can choose from Dolce & Gabbana, Prada, or Chanel. For one-of-a-kind boutiques, try Vince, St. John Knits Boutique, or Tod’s. For more boutique shopping, try the Lincoln Park, Hyde Park, or Andersonville neighborhoods. The Magnificent Mile is famous for its 450 retailers, including flagship and department stores, boutiques, and innovative technology. There’s the Green City Market for fresh produce and baked bread and a few thrift stores.

In this city of 2.7 million, the local, county, state, and special sales taxes add up to a rate of 10.25%.

Hollywood streets at sunset lined with palm trees and crowded with people.

Sean Pavone // Shutterstock

Los Angeles

Shopping in LA can be an adventure in luxury boutiques, grand-scale retail stores, and trendy rock ‘n’ roll shops. Nearby Beverly Hills is home to the famous Rodeo Drive, part of the so-called Golden Triangle that offers high-end shopping from Missoni, Gucci, and Burberry, among many other high-end brands. Sunset Strip, called “The Strip,” showers shoppers with various restaurants, hotels, and amazing clothing and accessory options.

It’s almost impossible to completely encompass all the options in this city of 3.9 million, with sales from household-name designers to the most exclusive boutiques. When you need a break, try Hollywood Farmers Market in the Fairfax District for fresh produce, and find Your Hilltop Coffee + Kitchen for refreshments from a Black-owned business in downtown LA.

The 2021 population was 3.85 million, and the total local sales tax rate is 9.5%.

The Galleria Mall with an ice skating rink at the bottom decorated with Christmas trees and crowded with shoppers.

Brandon Bell // Getty Images

Houston

Posh shoppers in Houston can visit fancy stores like those from Elizabeth Anthony, I W Marks Jewelers, or Abejas Boutique. To get ready to make an entrance at a fancy event, try some of the luxury brands at the Galleria mall or in the River Oaks District. There’s plenty to eat, too, from all sorts of culinary and ethnic traditions.

The city of 2.3 million has a total local sales tax rate of 8.25%.

Patrons at a gourmet Italian market.

Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group // Getty Images

Philadelphia

Mall shoppers can head to the Fashion District Philadelphia, Market Street, or The Shops at Liberty Place. But to shop like a local, try the Bourse, Fabric Row, or Chestnut Hill neighborhoods for tree-lined streets of boutiques. Rittenhouse Row is Philly’s five-star destination, and West Market Parkway District is more residential, with newer shops opening for the growing population. Old City offers other boutiques like Vagabond and Sugarcube. The 68-year-old shopping center Bala Cynwyd is getting an $8 million facelift.

The city of 1.6 million has a total local sales tax rate of 9%, but there’s no sales tax on most clothes or shoes.

People exploring the Ballard farmers market.

steve estvanik // Shutterstock

Seattle

Many people think of Pike Place Market or Capitol Hill for Seattle-inspired gifts and funky boutiques, but there are other quirks to this lively shopping town. The Refind Closet, a new resale store in the Madison Park neighborhood, gives shoppers previews of new-to-you items in live fashion shows on Instagram.

In the Ballard neighborhood, shoppers will find fashion boutiques, vintage stores, a farmers market, and home goods and gifts. Sundays on Ballard Avenue showcases local vendors’ baked goods, meats, and apparel. For mall shoppers, try Pacific Place, Westlake Center, or University Village.

The city of 715,000 has a total local sales tax rate of 10.25%.

This story originally appeared on CouponBirds and was produced and
distributed in partnership with Stacker Studio.

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