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How can organizations attract and retain IT talent?

Gartner has outlined three ways

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One of the biggest stories in digital transformation right now? Attracting and retaining IT talent. 

According to Gartner, the labor market has tightened in the last two years. They report that:

  • 60% of HR leaders are “significantly concerned” about employee turnover.
  • 62% of candidates have explored a career change in the last year.
  • Nearly three-quarters of candidates who receive a job offer have at least one other offer on the table.

Amid stories from the ‘Great Resignation,’ workers in all industries are pushing for higher compensation, better benefits, and increased flexibility — and IT talent is no exception. In fact, Gartner’s Global Labor Market Survey found that compensation is the top driver for IT talent attraction and retention. According to a recent Gartner IT Compensation Increase Poll, 50% of organizations reported increasing the salaries of key employees after they received a separate job offer — all in a bid to retain this talent.

How can organizations effectively attract talent and, most importantly, retain these employees? Gartner has outlined three ways.

Make monitoring and raising pay competitiveness a priority

As Gartner explains, “In order to pinpoint where additional funding will be necessary to address pay gaps in the short term, work with your HR team to identify IT roles and skills areas facing higher attrition risk and recruitment challenges due to noncompetitive compensation.”

Limited resources? Prioritize roles in high-risk areas, they explain.

Build flexibility into IT compensation through variable pay programs

“One way to minimize locking in compensation adjustments as long-term fixed costs,” explains  Lily Mok, Gartner VP Analyst, “is to use variable pay components that can be adjusted or removed as talent needs and market conditions evolve.”

Examples of these include skills-based premium pay, a signing bonus (lump sum or split up), and retention bonuses (eg. during a major period of transition).

Make sure managers can have successful pay-related conversations

According to Gartner, there are three important elements needed to make sure these conversations are effective. 

First, never forget empathy — especially since finances are a very personal topic and can be a sensitive issue.

Second, make sure the compensation package’s value is clearly outlined and understood. This includes pay, bonuses, benefits, etc.

Finally, be transparent about the organization’s pay structure, and how pay rates are set. After all, there are many sites out there (eg. Glassdoor) that features self-reported public pay data. 

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How will CIOs define success in 2021?

New research suggests CIOs are prioritizing digital transformation to “future-proof” their organizations and build resiliency.

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Recently, we reported IDC’s 2021 predictions, which noted that while CIOs have faced epic-level challenges this year, they’ll need to be in the front seat of the upcoming economic relief efforts.

At the top of IDC’s list was the prediction that by 2022, “65% of CIOs will digitally empower and enable front-line workers with data, AI, and security to extend their productivity, adaptability, and decision-making in the face of rapid changes.”

Since then, Gartner has also chimed into the CIO + Future of Work discussion. They identified “automation of routine work with AI, digital dexterity, and hybrid work with distributed workforce” as areas CIOs should focus on.

Now, a new report (based on a survey of over 100 Fortune 500 CIOs) from digital adoption platform WalkMe has uncovered how CIOs and IT organizations will define success in 2021, expanding on these aforementioned trends.

Multi-pronged approaches

In The CIO Outlook 2021, WalkMe — who commissioned Constellation Research for the report — found that 77% of CIOs list automation and AI as key to improving the effectiveness of IT. 59% say ROI from IT can be achieved through portfolio assessment and rationalization.

“CIOs are prioritizing overall digital change, keeping the organization safe, and improving the worker condition,” says WalkMe. Looking ahead, “CIOs must invest in finding the right models for enabling remote work while supporting their users.”

In order for organizations to adapt to change and become future-proof, CIOs need a multi-pronged approach, featuring:

  • No-code solutions
  • The automation of repetitive processes
  • Key software integration
  • Training and service through new approaches

As quoted in ITProPortal, Constellation VP and Principal Analyst Dion Hinchcliffe says:

“This data, gathered from top CIOs around the world, shows that they will be seeking dramatic improvements, especially significantly higher ROI (10-20 percent+) from their IT investment next year.” 

Want to read the full report? Find it here.

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Why upskilling is key to oil & gas digital transformation

A new EY survey found that 90% of industry executives agree that investments in technology and workforce are key to current market survival.

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COVID-19 has accelerated digital transformation timeliness across the board — and the oil & gas sector is no different. 

According to a new EY survey, 90% of O&G executives said that investments in technology and a strong, skilled workforce are needed for the sector to withstand current market conditions.

The Oil and Gas Digital Transformation and the Workforce Survey 2020 also found that 58% of executives said that COVID has “made investing in digital technology more urgent, with a majority planning to invest a great deal (29%) or moderate amount (51%) relative to their total budget.”

As EY Global Oil & Gas Leader Andy Brogan explains, the pandemic has had a major impact on DX timelines, shifting adoption from five years to three months.

“The cost savings digital can deliver for organizations is critical for survival in today’s low-price environment, as oil and gas companies look to gain greater operational efficiencies and drive productivity across the value chain. However, to capture the full value of these investments, oil and gas companies need the skills to harness and use the technology to its maximum potential.”

Addressing skills gaps 

The accelerated pace of DX adoption in the sector brings up questions about the workforce, and whether their skills align with the increase in pace. 

The answer is hardly surprising. 

According to the survey, 46% of respondents (on average) report that their current workforce isn’t equipped with the necessary skills to match tech investment. Respondents also report that 60% of their workers need to be reskilled or upskilled.

92% report that reskilling efforts will be key in their success over the next three years.

“It’s not enough for companies to simply spend more on technology,” explained Tim Haskell, US Oil & Gas People Advisory Services Leader for Ernst & Young LLP.

“Investment in the workforce is needed to scale and integrate technologies and ultimately capture the intended value. Companies must find an investment balance while addressing market pressures. Otherwise, the industry could potentially lose crucial years and a generation of workers.”

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5 types of leaders who can get in the way

From the saboteur to the capacity monster, these personalities can hurt grassroots support for your digital transformation.

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Successful digital transformations require support from almost everyone in the company and in particular, from other leaders. You can have the best playbook ever produced, but it won’t matter, if you still lack that leadership support.

Leaders are so critical because they influence the attitudes and perceptions of the people on their teams. When they resist the change, their people will resist – and that paves a long and difficult road for the transformation. If they’re excited about the transformation, their support enhances your efforts and builds the momentum you need to succeed.

CIOs who navigate their colleagues’ different leadership styles and give the struggling leader what they need, without compromising the core goals of the transformation, will clear the path to a successful transformation.

In practice, we see five types of leaders who can stand in the way. Navigate their personalities and push back to move the transformation forward and (hopefully) bring them along with you.

The Saboteur

Every good spy movie includes a saboteur. Saboteurs appear to be on the team, which gives them access to information: But in reality, they work to subvert good efforts by collaborating with the villain. The hero of the movie eventually finds them out and “eliminates” them.

Identifying the saboteur and guiding them to support the mission requires more finesse in the real world. They resist behind the scenes, in conversations with the people they lead, and in everyday decisions. However they appear supportive in conversations with you.

To spot them, do some sensing in their organizations. Leaders reproduce their attitudes in their organizations and saboteurs betray themselves through their team(s). While you do your sensing, ensure you remain respectful and avoid becoming a saboteur yourself when discussing the situation with people on their team.

Be mindful that not every saboteur sabotages intentionally. They may not realize their own resistance and certainly, most lack malice. However they still resist the effort. Your mission: Discover why they resist and eliminate that challenge for them.

The HiPPO

HiPPO stands for “Highest Paid Person with an Opinion.” HiPPOs share their opinion with anyone willing to listen. They announce it in lead team meetings and they declare it to their team. Each moment offers an opportunity to actively resist transformation efforts.

Identifying a HiPPO is easy. They know they resist and probably already told you 10 frustrating aspects of the transformation that are “wrong” or “doomed to fail.” However they create collateral damage for the transformation very quickly, so get ahead of them as soon as you see one coming.

HiPPOs may be intimidating, but winning them over is often critical to your efforts. To resolve their concerns, sit down with them in a one-to-one meeting with an intent to learn. They probably have valid concerns and adjusting your transformation strategy to alleviate those concerns will not only win their support, it will strengthen your transformation strategy.

One other reason to win a HiPPO’s support for the effort: HiPPOs who support the effort can evangelize the transformation effort. In fact, winning the support of a HiPPO in early stages bolsters support for the rest of the transformation.

The Eeyore

Remember Eeyore from “Winnie the Pooh?” The pessimistic donkey dragged his feet on adventures and shuddered with fear during storms. Change scares him simply because it means something will be different.

Your digital transformation requires changes that frighten the tail off Eeyore. You stand in front of the room excitedly casting vision while they sit in the corner making a list of reasons the transformation will fail. At the top of that list? “It’s different than how we do it today.”

If Eeyore’s people are onboard, you can maintain the course. However, if they remain reticent, you need to win them over directly or win Eeyore’s support, which will help secure everyone’s buy-in.

Winning the support of an Eeyore requires empathy. As an IT leader, change drives your entire world and you adjust quite easily. However, Eeyore sees the flood of new information coming at them and turns away in fear. Spending time viewing the world from their standpoint and feeling the pressure and fear they feel provides perspective to ensure you capture important details, while showing Eeyore you care about their ability to make the change.

In reality, Eeyore rarely derails a transformation because everyone already knows they lag behind, which sadly causes their opinion to be dismissed by others more easily.

The Lukewarm Buzzkill

Some leaders (even visionaries) cannot see the vision you cast for them. You stand in front of the room, cast vision for the transformation (you nail it!)  and everyone is onboard, except one person who just doesn’t seem to get it. They’re lukewarm at best and they can drain the excitement from the room.

You can spot a Lukewarm Buzzkill by their lack of support. In normal circumstances, they voice support and cast their own vision for new initiatives. In this case, they disengage or they quietly wait for more information because they’ve heard the buzzwords and they’ve heard the theory, but it’s not real to them. They’re not afraid of change. They just can’t see where you’re headed. Gain their support and you get a teammate that naturally casts vision to everyone around them.

To help them, change the way you communicate. Instead of using charts and diagrams, make it tangible for them. They must see it to grab hold of it and become ardent supporters. Consider enrolling a designer to bring the transformation to life (app mockups, tool designs, etc).

A note of caution: When you show how an app might work or what the new customer interaction will look like, you create a risk. If they disagree with your theoretical execution, you create an uphill battle for yourself. To mitigate the risk, tell them the mockups represent ideas and then invite them into the brainstorming and more fully enroll them in the transformation process.

The Capacity Monster

Some leaders and their organizations lack capacity to play a key role in the transformation.

When you ask for their help these “capacity monsters” push back, talking about other priorities. Sometimes those priorities represent an unwillingness to change, in which case you need to address them as an Eeyore. Other times, those priorities build the business, and respecting them produces better business results.

When their reasons are truly mission-critical, win their support by investing transformation efforts more heavily in their direction. Consider addressing their current bottlenecks or finding tangential opportunities to help them create capacity. Either way, give them support in their mission-critical work.

While you’re helping them, strive to over-deliver and develop a case study. Eliminating their bottlenecks and helping their high-profile work succeed gives you an easy success to share, which can win support from other leaders for the transformation.

Enrolling these five types of leaders builds a critical front for pushing the transformation forward.  Doing it well multiplies your efforts across the entire organization, enrolling not just the leaders, but the people they influence. When you do that, the entire company will soon be bought-into the transformation, setting it up for success and building the organization’s capacity to tackle future change efforts more eagerly.

This article originally appeared on The Enterprisers Project under the headline: Digital transformation: 5 types of leaders who can get in the way. It is republished here with permission.

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